Author Topic: I stopped using Google today....  (Read 4398 times)

Offline Merlin-HD

Re: I stopped using Google today....
« Reply #30 on: December 19, 2018, 11:41:30 AM »
I could install LineageOS or something else.

Disabling most of the Google apps stops telemetry, and installing NetGuard Firewall from F-Droid store and configuring it blocks everything else.


Or you could get A Nokia .. these days they sell the "non smartphone" version like in the good old days before phones became"smart" and "google spying on you" lol  :BWAHAHAH: :Whoohoo:

Offline oNyX

Re: I stopped using Google today....
« Reply #31 on: December 31, 2018, 09:11:12 PM »

Or you could get A Nokia .. these days they sell the "non smartphone" version like in the good old days before phones became"smart" and "google spying on you" lol  :BWAHAHAH: :Whoohoo:

Like this guy...

iPhone 6 vs Nokia 3310 - Why the Nokia 3310 is Better
I have lost my interest in this hobby.

Offline Katji

Re: I stopped using Google today....
« Reply #32 on: January 23, 2019, 05:18:31 PM »
Quote
This has been a learning curve for surveillance capitalists, driven by competition over prediction products. First they learned that the more surplus the better the prediction, which led to economies of scale in supply efforts. Then they learned that the more varied the surplus the higher its predictive value. This new drive toward economies of scope sent them from the desktop to mobile, out into the world: your drive, run, shopping, search for a parking space, your blood and face, and always… location, location, location.

The evolution did not stop there. Ultimately they understood that the most predictive behavioural data comes from what I call “economies of action”, as systems are designed to intervene in the state of play and actually modify behaviour, shaping it toward desired commercial outcomes. We saw the experimental development of this new “means of behavioural modification” in Facebook’s contagion experiments and the Google-incubated augmented reality game Pokémon Go.

It is no longer enough to automate information flows about us; the goal now is to automate us. These processes are meticulously designed to produce ignorance by circumventing individual awareness and thus eliminate any possibility of self-determination. As one data scientist explained to me, “We can engineer the context around a particular behaviour and force change that way… We are learning how to write the music, and then we let the music make them dance.”

This power to shape behaviour for others’ profit or power is entirely self-authorising. It has no foundation in democratic or moral legitimacy, as it usurps decision rights and erodes the processes of individual autonomy that are essential to the function of a democratic society. The message here is simple: Once I was mine. Now I am theirs.

The Guardian | Technology | 'The goal is to automate us': welcome to the age of surveillance capitalism

https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2019/jan/20/shoshana-zuboff-age-of-surveillance-capitalism-google-facebook

Shoshana Zuboff’s new book is a chilling exposé of the business model that underpins the digital world. Observer tech columnist John Naughton explains the importance of Zuboff’s work and asks the author 10 key questions.

We’re living through the most profound transformation in our information environment since Johannes Gutenberg’s invention of printing in circa 1439. And the problem with living through a revolution is that it’s impossible to take the long view of what’s happening. Hindsight is the only exact science in this business, and in that long run we’re all dead. Printing shaped and transformed societies over the next four centuries, but nobody in Mainz (Gutenberg’s home town) in, say, 1495 could have known that his technology would (among other things): fuel the Reformation and undermine the authority of the mighty Catholic church; enable the rise of what we now recognise as modern science; create unheard-of professions and industries; change the shape of our brains; and even recalibrate our conceptions of childhood. And yet printing did all this and more.

Why choose 1495? Because we’re about the same distance into our revolution, the one kicked off by digital technology and networking. And although it’s now gradually dawning on us that this really is a big deal and that epochal social and economic changes are under way, we’re as clueless about where it’s heading and what’s driving it as the citizens of Mainz were in 1495.

That’s not for want of trying, mind. Library shelves groan under the weight of books about what digital technology is doing to us and our world. Lots of scholars are thinking, researching and writing about this stuff. But they’re like the blind men trying to describe the elephant in the old fable: everyone has only a partial view, and nobody has the whole picture. So our contemporary state of awareness is – as Manuel Castells, the great scholar of cyberspace once put it – one of “informed bewilderment”.
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Which is why the arrival of Shoshana Zuboff’s new book is such a big event. Many years ago – in 1988, to be precise – as one of the first female professors at Harvard Business School to hold an endowed chair she published a landmark book, The Age of the Smart Machine: The Future of Work and Power, which changed the way we thought about the impact of computerisation on organisations and on work. It provided the most insightful account up to that time of how digital technology was changing the work of both managers and workers. And then Zuboff appeared to go quiet, though she was clearly incubating something bigger. The first hint of what was to come was a pair of startling essays – one in an academic journal in 2015, the other in a German newspaper in 2016. What these revealed was that she had come up with a new lens through which to view what Google, Facebook et al were doing – nothing less than spawning a new variant of capitalism. Those essays promised a more comprehensive expansion of this Big Idea.

And now it has arrived – the most ambitious attempt yet to paint the bigger picture and to explain how the effects of digitisation that we are now experiencing as individuals and citizens have come about.

The headline story is that it’s not so much about the nature of digital technology as about a new mutant form of capitalism that has found a way to use tech for its purposes. The name Zuboff has given to the new variant is “surveillance capitalism”. It works by providing free services that billions of people cheerfully use, enabling the providers of those services to monitor the behaviour of those users in astonishing detail – often without their explicit consent.

“Surveillance capitalism,” she writes, “unilaterally claims human experience as free raw material for translation into behavioural data. Although some of these data are applied to service improvement, the rest are declared as a proprietary behavioural surplus, fed into advanced manufacturing processes known as ‘machine intelligence’, and fabricated into prediction products that anticipate what you will do now, soon, and later. Finally, these prediction products are traded in a new kind of marketplace that I call behavioural futures markets.

While the general modus operandi of Google, Facebook et al has been known and understood (at least by some people) for a while, what has been missing – and what Zuboff provides – is the insight and scholarship to situate them in a wider context. She points out that while most of us think that we are dealing merely with algorithmic inscrutability, in fact what confronts us is the latest phase in capitalism’s long evolution – from the making of products, to mass production, to managerial capitalism, to services, to financial capitalism, and now to the exploitation of behavioural predictions covertly derived from the surveillance of users. In that sense, her vast (660-page) book is a continuation of a tradition that includes Adam Smith, Max Weber, Karl Polanyi and – dare I say it – Karl Marx.

    Digital technology is separating the citizens in all societies into two groups: the watchers and the watched

Viewed from this perspective, the behaviour of the digital giants looks rather different from the roseate hallucinations of Wired magazine. What one sees instead is a colonising ruthlessness of which John D Rockefeller would have been proud. First of all there was the arrogant appropriation of users’ behavioural data – viewed as a free resource, there for the taking. Then the use of patented methods to extract or infer data even when users had explicitly denied permission, followed by the use of technologies that were opaque by design and fostered user ignorance.

And, of course, there is also the fact that the entire project was conducted in what was effectively lawless – or at any rate law-free – territory. Thus Google decided that it would digitise and store every book ever printed, regardless of copyright issues. Or that it would photograph every street and house on the planet without asking anyone’s permission. Facebook launched its infamous “beacons”, which reported a user’s online activities and published them to others’ news feeds without the knowledge of the user. And so on, in accordance with the disrupter’s mantra that “it is easier to ask for forgiveness than for permission”.

When the security expert Bruce Schneier wrote that “surveillance is the business model of the internet” he was really only hinting at the reality that Zuboff has now illuminated. The combination of state surveillance and its capitalist counterpart means that digital technology is separating the citizens in all societies into two groups: the watchers (invisible, unknown and unaccountable) and the watched. This has profound consequences for democracy because asymmetry of knowledge translates into asymmetries of power. But whereas most democratic societies have at least some degree of oversight of state surveillance, we currently have almost no regulatory oversight of its privatised counterpart.

[...]  Operationally this meant that Google would both repurpose its growing cache of behavioural data, now put to work as a behavioural data surplus, and develop methods to aggressively seek new sources of this surplus.

The company developed new methods of secret surplus capture that could uncover data that users intentionally opted to keep private, as well as to infer extensive personal information that users did not or would not provide. And this surplus would then be analysed for hidden meanings that could predict click-through behaviour. The surplus data became the basis for new predictions markets called targeted advertising.

Here was the origin of surveillance capitalism in an unprecedented and lucrative brew: behavioural surplus, data science, material infrastructure, computational power, algorithmic systems, and automated platforms. As click-through rates skyrocketed, advertising quickly became as important as search. Eventually it became the cornerstone of a new kind of commerce that depended upon online surveillance at scale.

The success of these new mechanisms only became visible when Google went public in 2004. That’s when it finally revealed that between 2001 and its 2004 IPO, revenues increased by 3,590%.

JN: So surveillance capitalism started with advertising, but then became more general?

SZ: Surveillance capitalism is no more limited to advertising than mass production was limited to the fabrication of the Ford Model T. It quickly became the default model for capital accumulation in Silicon Valley, embraced by nearly every startup and app. And it was a Google executive – Sheryl Sandberg – who played the role of Typhoid Mary, bringing surveillance capitalism from Google to Facebook, when she signed on as Mark Zuckerberg’s number two in 2008. By now it’s no longer restricted to individual companies or even to the internet sector. It has spread across a wide range of products, services, and economic sectors, including insurance, retail, healthcare, finance, entertainment, education, transportation, and more, birthing whole new ecosystems of suppliers, producers, customers, market-makers, and market players. Nearly every product or service that begins with the word “smart” or “personalised”, every internet-enabled device, every “digital assistant”, is simply a supply-chain interface for the unobstructed flow of behavioural data on its way to predicting our futures in a surveillance economy.

[...]  https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2019/jan/20/shoshana-zuboff-age-of-surveillance-capitalism-google-facebook

Offline oNyX

Re: I stopped using Google today....
« Reply #33 on: January 24, 2019, 08:39:20 PM »
Digital technology is separating the citizens in all societies into two groups: the watchers and the watched

This is exactly what is happening. The less tech-aware you are the more susceptible you are for surveillance capitalism.

Ads and trackers has become such a burden on everyday browsing, I cannot browse without Privacy Badger and uBlock Origin.
I have lost my interest in this hobby.

Offline Crankshaft

Re: I stopped using Google today....
« Reply #34 on: April 12, 2021, 06:19:05 PM »
Shoshana Zuboff’s book is one of my favourites,  I have read it twice.

I have difficulty in explaining the perils of surveillance capitalism to my 12 and 14 year old.  They label me a crazy conspricy crank.

Are there any books on the subject aimed specifically at young children.
Written in a way that they can relate to?

Offline sajunky

Re: I stopped using Google today....
« Reply #35 on: April 13, 2021, 01:29:15 AM »
Not sure. Stick to new Huawei phones free of a Google Fool-Play Services. Bad things had happened for Huawei, it is good for you.

So far you could disable apps, but there is a reason why you couldn't disable Google Fool-Play Services. If you are clever, root a phone yourself (Xiaomi).
If it measures good and sounds bad—it's bad. If it measures bad and sounds good, you've measured the wrong thing.
/ Daniel R. von Recklinghausen, Chief Engineer, H.H. Scott/

Offline Trompie67

Re: I stopped using Google today....
« Reply #36 on: April 13, 2021, 05:45:29 AM »
^^^It's not just the OS that tracks you, but the apps themselves. Apple is vastly superior to Android when it comes to forcing app developers to specifically require & explain what permissions & tracking/data collection they do.

On home network, use Firefox & lock it down.  Through browser settings block all except essential cookies. Facebook/Insta etc in containers. Delete history & cookies when you exit the browser. Duck Duck Go instead of Google as a search engine.

Use Cloudflare or OpenDNS instead of your ISP's DNS.

Install Pi-hole or Adguard as DNS blockers on home network.

Install Lockdown on all your mobile devices.

Here's screenshots of Lockdown & AdGuard for the last week:







"Trumpets are a bit more adventurous; they're drunk! Trumpeters are generally drunk. It wets their whistle."
Paul McCartney

With thanks to F_D for this pearl of wisdom!

Offline chrisc

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Re: I stopped using Google today....
« Reply #37 on: May 10, 2021, 01:36:11 PM »
Been using Tor for a while.  It slows everything down somewhat, but you are totally anonymous.  The default Search Engine is Duck Duck Go

On an iPhone and iPad, I use QWANT.  As good as Google
Music is the shorthand of emotion

Offline Crankshaft

Re: I stopped using Google today....
« Reply #38 on: May 10, 2021, 02:44:11 PM »
Got my Adguard Home server up and running on a Raspberry Pi yesterday.

Offline Trompie67

Re: I stopped using Google today....
« Reply #39 on: May 10, 2021, 03:24:55 PM »
Got my Adguard Home server up and running on a Raspberry Pi yesterday.

Go into the GUI & select ALL the blocklists. (You need to go to the "add blocklist" then choose from list dialogue box). The only one I do not have enabled is the game console ad blocklist as that screwed up some of the teenagers online games.
"Trumpets are a bit more adventurous; they're drunk! Trumpeters are generally drunk. It wets their whistle."
Paul McCartney

With thanks to F_D for this pearl of wisdom!

Offline adie

Re: I stopped using Google today....
« Reply #40 on: May 10, 2021, 03:46:54 PM »
Been using Tor for a while.  It slows everything down somewhat, but you are totally anonymous.  The default Search Engine is Duck Duck Go

On an iPhone and iPad, I use QWANT.  As good as Google

https://thehackernews.com/2021/05/over-25-of-tor-exit-relays-are-spying.html

Notice anything strange @chrisc ?

Offline Crankshaft

Re: I stopped using Google today....
« Reply #41 on: May 10, 2021, 04:48:58 PM »
Thank you.  I still have to fine-tune the system.

Go into the GUI & select ALL the blocklists. (You need to go to the "add blocklist" then choose from list dialogue box). The only one I do not have enabled is the game console ad blocklist as that screwed up some of the teenagers online games.

Offline chrisc

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Re: I stopped using Google today....
« Reply #42 on: May 10, 2021, 09:19:13 PM »
https://thehackernews.com/2021/05/over-25-of-tor-exit-relays-are-spying.html

Notice anything strange @chrisc ?

It can be painfully slow sometimes.  So much so I started using Firefox again.  My web browsing would not raise any flags, especially vining AV Forum.  I find far less pop-up ads in Firefox and none at all using Tor
Music is the shorthand of emotion