Author Topic: Official Can Evaluation Playlist  (Read 206 times)

Offline Scubadude

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Official Can Evaluation Playlist
« on: February 23, 2017, 09:33:03 PM »
A suggestion / request from a closet canner ... some reference tracks for headphone evaluation, with what to listen for for in each track.  Give us your favourites ...s1n0, Carmel, Wolve ... the floor is yours ...
"We should no more let numbers define audio quality than we should let chemical analysis be the arbiter of fine wines."  Nelson Pass

Offline Rotten Johnny

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Re: Official Can Evaluation Playlist
« Reply #1 on: February 23, 2017, 09:34:38 PM »
 :giggle:
Audiophile: There is almost no other group that prides themselves more on wasting good money on utterly worthless ****, and then trying to furiously blow smoke up their own ass to justify it.

Free your mind...and your ass will follow.

Offline Scubadude

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Re: Official Can Evaluation Playlist
« Reply #2 on: February 24, 2017, 01:19:40 PM »
Right let's get this thing started. Couple of suggestions courtesy of Brent Butterworth of soundandvision.com

Holly Cole, “Train Song” (from Temptation): This has been my #1 demo track since it was released in 1995. The deep bass notes that start the tune let me judge a product’s bass output as well as the quality (tight, loose, etc.) of the bass. I use the percussion to judge soundstage width. A super-high-pitched chime, struck right after Cole sings the line “…never, never, never ring a bell” lets me judge a tweeter’s high-frequency extension.

Bebel Gilberto, “Aganjú” (from Bebel Gilberto): Gilberto’s voice on this tune can sound edgy through some speakers. It shouldn’t. Also, once the tune gets going, two deep bass notes appear; some speakers and subs can’t reproduce the deepest one.

Ron Sexsmith, “Words We Never Use” (from Ron Sexsmith): Sexsmith’s voice is supposed to sound just a little coarse. Not smooth, not real coarse, just a little coarse. If it doesn’t sound like that, something’s wrong somewhere, possibly in the speaker’s crossover.

Steely Dan, “Aja” (from Aja): This is my reference when I want to hear what “regular music” sounds like through an audio product. It’s packed with hard-to-reproduce stuff: Fagen’s reedy voice, a perfectly plucked bass line, a piano that sounds hard and cheap through many speakers, lush background vocals, and a big-sounding tenor sax solo from Wayne Shorter. But mostly, I just listen for how the tune grooves.

Dennis and David Kamakahi, “Ulili’E” (from Ohana):  Dennis Kamakahi is the Johnny Hartman of Hawaii. His rich baritone and the detuned low strings of his slack-key guitar fall right into the frequencies where a subwoofer crossover usually operates; lots of systems make his voice sound bloated and the guitar sound boomy. Also, son David’s ukulele is a mellow-sounding, koa-bodied, nylon-string instrument, and if it sounds bright like a steel-string instrument, something’s amiss in your system.

World Saxophone Quartet, “The Holy Men” (from Metamorphosis): This recording features four saxophones, each one positioned at a certain point in the stereo soundstage. The very best systems give you a solid stereo image of each saxophone, and let you easily distinguish the four player’s tones and improvised melodic lines.

The Coryells, “Sentenza del Cuore – Allegro” (from The Coryells): Best recording I’ve found for gauging soundstage depth. Listen for the castanets in the background. On mediocre systems, they’ll sound like they’re a few feet behind the speakers. On great systems, they’ll sound like they’re 30 feet behind the speakers.

Trilok Gurtu, “Once I Wished a Tree Upside Down” (from Living Magic): The bell tree that percussionist Gurtu shakes in the intro provides the best test of a stereo system’s ambience that I’ve ever found. Listen to it though a pair of electrostatics (like MartinLogans) or planar magnetics (like Magnepans), and you’ll actually hear the bell tree circling around you.

Olive, “Falling” (from Extra Virgin): The melodic, deep, synth-bass line in this tune is tough for most speakers and many subwoofers to play at all. If your sub plays all the notes without distortion and is able to make all the pitches sound distinct, you’ve got a good one. To prevent ear strain, I created a custom test track with the treble rolled off (down -6 dB at 20 kHz), because the vocals are recorded way too bright on this one.

Saint-Saëns’ Symphony No. 3 “Organ Symphony” (from Boston Audio Society Test CD-1): This recording of an orchestra and a pipe organ has deep bass response down to 16 Hz. Only the largest, most serious subwoofers can reproduce the deepest tones.

Mötley Crüe, “Kickstart My Heart” (from Dr. Feelgood): This heavy metal classic is one of my most-used demo tracks. The bass and kick drum can sound dramatically different on different subs — punchy on the best subs, smeared or bloated on the worst ones. Also, the highly compressed mix provides such a consistently rich output, almost like high-level pink noise, that it’s great for judging distortion in inexpensive systems. When Vince Neil’s voice starts to sound strained or distorted, back off 1 dB and you’ve got a pretty good idea of the max output of the system.

Read more at http://www.soundandvision.com/content/test-tracks-your-most-important-audio-tool#cMJreicKjUXTRwvO.99
"We should no more let numbers define audio quality than we should let chemical analysis be the arbiter of fine wines."  Nelson Pass

Offline kaptein oubaas

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« Last Edit: February 24, 2017, 02:18:02 PM by kaptein oubaas »