Author Topic: Still learning  (Read 1120 times)

Offline hazelbags

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Still learning
« on: June 28, 2015, 08:24:10 PM »
So as some of you might know, I recently got an onkyo HT-S4505 setup.

It is truly a huge difference compared to my HTiB that I had.

Now I'd like to know some stuff.

On the back I have 7 speaker connection areas, 5 of them are called A and the other 2 are called B, so what is this for? On the remote I can select A or B or both at thr same time.

What type of speakers can I connect to for the surrounds? Will any type of B&W work or even waferdale?

What is a power amp?

This is what I can think of now. If I think of anything else I will post here again.

Thanks
Hazelbag

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Re: Still learning
« Reply #1 on: June 29, 2015, 07:34:08 AM »
it would help if you took the time to read the manual  :RTFM:
you would know what A and B does
use the speakers that came with the unit
they are matched well with the amplifier
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Offline hazelbags

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Re: Still learning
« Reply #2 on: June 29, 2015, 11:56:58 AM »
I have read the manual and it foes not state as to what it is for only how to connect the components

Offline Ju_dy@RT

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Re: Still learning
« Reply #3 on: June 29, 2015, 12:24:46 PM »
Hi Hazelbags!

Speakers A is for your main area/zone.  Speakers B would usually be for an alternative area. The Amp assign on the advanced menu, may allow you to change this, not to sure on the Onkyo. 

Usually when you can listen to two different sources in two different rooms, it would be referred to as Zones 1 & 2 (&3... etc)
When you have to listen to the same thing, but can switch on and off independently, it would be referred to A & B.

Speakers for rears are less imperative to match with your front speakers ito brand but basically make sure that they are in accordance to the power output of your amp.  Generally a basic 4-6" within your budget will work the charm, as long as they do not overpower your front speakers, which should be the bigger speakers in your system (So yes, B&W or wharfdale will do)

A Power amp is standalone amplification (without processing).  Imagine taking your AVR and dividing it into two pieces... one for decoding ( the processor, where you plug all your sources into) and one just for power (the poweramp - where you would plug your speakers into) and connecting the two to work as one.

Hope it helps!
« Last Edit: June 29, 2015, 12:29:47 PM by Ju_dy@RT »

Offline hazelbags

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Re: Still learning
« Reply #4 on: June 29, 2015, 01:12:00 PM »
Hi Hazelbags!

Speakers A is for your main area/zone.  Speakers B would usually be for an alternative area. The Amp assign on the advanced menu, may allow you to change this, not to sure on the Onkyo. 

Usually when you can listen to two different sources in two different rooms, it would be referred to as Zones 1 & 2 (&3... etc)
When you have to listen to the same thing, but can switch on and off independently, it would be referred to A & B.

Speakers for rears are less imperative to match with your front speakers ito brand but basically make sure that they are in accordance to the power output of your amp.  Generally a basic 4-6" within your budget will work the charm, as long as they do not overpower your front speakers, which should be the bigger speakers in your system (So yes, B&W or wharfdale will do)

A Power amp is standalone amplification (without processing).  Imagine taking your AVR and dividing it into two pieces... one for decoding ( the processor, where you plug all your sources into) and one just for power (the poweramp - where you would plug your speakers into) and connecting the two to work as one.

Hope it helps!
Thanks, this makes some sense now.

Is it bettet running speakers off a power amp?

Offline Ju_dy@RT

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Re: Still learning
« Reply #5 on: June 29, 2015, 04:39:27 PM »
Power amps allow for more power than you would  generally find in any AVR so generally used for a more beefier solution.  Also, the power amp will not date so if technology changes you will only have to update the processor/pre-amp. There is also the issues surround noise generated within an AVR etc, build etc...

All this comes at a cost though, especially if you want the latest and greatest.  Spec for spec you're probably looking around 50% (or more) more when going component, whilst there is VERY little, if nothing in the sub R30K bracket (Retail).  An AVR will generally still be your best "value for money" option.

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Re: Still learning
« Reply #6 on: June 30, 2015, 07:45:16 AM »
you cannot connect a power amp to that unit as it does not have preouts
suum cuique pulchrum est


"I refuse to prove that I exist,'" says God, "for proof denies faith, and without faith I am nothing."

Offline Ju_dy@RT

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Re: Still learning
« Reply #7 on: June 30, 2015, 10:21:19 AM »
^^ +1.