Quick (relatively) Doro Wat (Ethiopian Chicken Curry)

JonnyP

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So I love Ethiopian food (my sister-in-law is Ethiopian and is a great cook in any currency).  I have hankerings for the spicy, deeply tasty food from the country but two limitations.  1. I cannot easily get the spiced butter used in most of the dishes, 2. I don?t have 12 hours to make a chicken curry! (Yes, the real version takes about that long).  So I searched around and adapted a recipe which is pretty quick (less than 2 hours but longer is still better), and tastes reasonably authentic.  Before anyone asks, no, injera is well beyond my capability so this works with rice or roti (or injera if you have a local supplier):

For two servings, or four if bolstered with other sides (recommended).

1. Grate two large onions (yes, grate, so they are very finely chopped, finer than you can manage with a knife)
2.  On a low to medium heat, melt unsalted butter and mix some oil in (don?t be shy with the butter, a 1cm slab for starters)
3.  Add the grated onion, a pinch of salt, and let it sweat for about 30 mins on a low heat (stir when necessary but don?t let it get too dry, add a little water if needs be.
4.  Add a tablespoon of grated ginger and a teaspoon of garlic, if necessary (ie. it looks dry or sticks), add another slab of butter (you will otherwise add this at the next step), cook, stirring as necessary for another 15minutes.
5.  Add one of the following-half a small wine glass of mead or tej (honey wine), or the same amount of white wine with a teaspoon of honey, or (as I do) the half a glass of honey liqueur (Barenjager) watered down (one 25ml measure in water). This then needs to cook another 15mins
6.  Prepare your chicken - cut into inch cubes and wash, then add the juice of a lemon and let it sit.
7. Boil and shell a couple of eggs (hard or medium hard boiled) while the sauce is cooking.
7.  Add two tablespoons of bere bere spice to the onion mix, stir through and let it cook (stirring as necessary) for about 30 mins.
8.  Add the chicken and another slab of butter to the sauce.  Stir through and let it cook (about another 30 mins). Add the hard boiled eggs for the last ten minutes to reheat and get a little saucy.
9.  Add any salt you think may be needed and serve once the chicken is cooked through.

Serve with injera, or roti, a tomato/cucumber/chilli salad, cottage cheese and alicha (like a thicker daal). Or just with rice and a salad on the side.
 

JonnyP

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Whoops, about 500g chicken breast and thigh deboned (you can do it with boned but take the skin off at least and it will have to cook a bit longer).  Can also use leftover roast chicken, just give it enough time to absorb a little sauce
 

mahleu

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Awesome, my mother grew up in Ethiopia, i've only eaten this a couple of times. It's amazing, and deadly.
 

Curlycat

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Thanks for posting this, it seems easy to make and delicious. I want to try it. However, I have never heard or seen Berbere spice. Do you know of any regular chain store that sells it? I see you can make your own but would prefer not too.

Woollies says the following: Looks like a really spicey and tasty blend of spice.
https://taste.co.za/glossary/berbere/

Berbere is a hot pepper seasoning essential for most Ethiopian dishes.
Make your own (makes about 1 cup):

5ml (1t) fenugreek seeds
40g (1/2 cup) ground dried serrano chillies or other ground chillies
40g (1/2 cup) paprika
30ml (2T) salt
10ml (2t) ground ginger
10ml (2t) onion powder
5ml (1t) ground cardamom, preferably
freshly ground
5ml (1t) ground nutmeg
2ml (1/2t) garlic powder
1ml (1/4t) ground cloves
1ml (1/4t) ground cinnamon
1ml (1/4t) ground allspice (and this... where does one get this?)


Finely grind the fenugreek seeds with a mortar and pestle or in an electric spice or coff ee grinder. Stir together with the remaining ingredients in a small bowl until well combined. Store in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 3 months.

This recipe is from The Soul of a New Cuisine by Marcus Sameulsson.

Ethiopian Berbere spice mix is great to use as a seasoning in meatballs or sprinkled over a roast chicken or leg of lamb.

Sprinkle over plain pizza bases with a bit of olive oil before baking. Cut into wedges and eat with olives and hummus.


 

JonnyP

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I have a store bought mix that I got at falafel fundi, continental sometimes sell the same mix.  It is made by Cedar Sesame Co in Meadowvale so should be possible to find.  I know that the real deal is available downtown in the Ethiopian stores of Durban, but am not at present visiting the CBD for the reason of it tending to be crowded and not necessarily masked!

The allspice is available as dried berries in most supermarkets, just blitz it in a spice grinder with the fenugreek and dried chillies if making your own.  The difficulty with bere bere is that it has two Ethiopian ingredients which cannot easily be substituted (same with the spiced butter), but a ready mix I use or the recipe in the Woolies mag are close enough.
 

JonnyP

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I?ll put up a tibs recipe and alicha once I make them again.  Still got wat left over so probably next week.

Should add that this goes well with a pale ale or if you don?t drink, try it with a Fanta!
 
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