Oled calibration needed

Safrazramjan

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Hi, I?m looking for someone that can do a calibration for me on an lg g1 77.

I live in mafikeng so maybe best someone near gauteng or north west province


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KenMasters

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The LG's are pretty accurate out the box, so no need to hire a calibrator (besides, I don't think there are any qualified calibrators in S.A.).

Simply sticking the TV on the Filmmaker Mode should get you 95% there. If there are any settings you're unsure about, let me know and I'll do my best to clear it up for you.
 

1am7h30n3

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https://www.rtings.com/tv/reviews/lg/c1-oled

rtings rated the LG C1 oled out of the box 'pre calibration' color accuracy as pretty bad, they gave it a 4.5/10. Or is that without putting it on filmmaker mode which solves everything?
 

KenMasters

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1am7h30n3 said:
https://www.rtings.com/tv/reviews/lg/c1-oled

rtings rated the LG C1 oled out of the box 'pre calibration' color accuracy as pretty bad, they gave it a 4.5/10. Or is that without putting it on filmmaker mode which solves everything?

I wouldn't trust Rtings, they're not calibrators and often make mistakes. Every LG OLED I've calibrated from the C8 upwards has had Delta Es under 3 with the correct picture settings, so colour me skeptical.

EDIT: AV Forums reviewed a 48" C1, 55" C1 and 55"G1 - all under 3 ( https://www.avforums.com/reviews/lg-55-inch-g1-oled55g1-4k-oled-tv-review.19473/ https://www.avforums.com/reviews/lg-c1-oled48c1-4k-oled-tv-review.19187/ https://www.avforums.com/reviews/lg-c1-oled55c1-4k-oled-tv-review.19182/
 

1am7h30n3

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KenMasters said:
I wouldn't trust Rtings, they're not calibrators and often make mistakes. Every LG OLED I've calibrated from the C8 upwards has had Delta Es under 3 with the correct picture settings, so colour me skeptical.

Awesome, thanks. I'm using rtings picture settings (not their calibration settings) though, or would you avoid those too?
 

KenMasters

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1am7h30n3 said:
Awesome, thanks. I'm using rtings picture settings (not their calibration settings) though, or would you avoid those too?

Link to them and I'll take a look and let you know.
 

1am7h30n3

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https://www.rtings.com/tv/reviews/lg/c1-oled/settings

Thanks! I ignored the calibration settings. The brightness is very high to my eyes so I run OLED pixel brightness on 0.
 

KenMasters

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1am7h30n3 said:
https://www.rtings.com/tv/reviews/lg/c1-oled/settings

Thanks! I ignored the calibration settings. The brightness is very high to my eyes so I run OLED pixel brightness on 0.

You did the right thing ignoring the white balance settings, they're unique to each set.

They recommend Expert Dark, but then tell you to set the gamma at 2.2 - this is wrong. What separates Expert Bright and Expert Dark is their gamma setting, Expert Dark is based around a gamma of 2.4, while Bright is oriented around 2.2

2.4 is the technically correct gamma for SDR content, but it is also based on the assumption you're watching content in dim lighting conditions. If you watch TV in a brighter room, you're better off with a gamma of 2.2.

They also recommend setting Peak Brightness to High, this is wrong for SDR, Peak Brightness should be left on the default Off. Its function is to boost the white sub-pixel for HDR use, it is not meant to be used with SDR content - it'll desaturate colours and drive your panel harder than is intended with SDR content.

Other than that, their recommendations are fine for SDR.

Looking at HDR, if you want the TV to track the PQ EOTF accurately, Auto Dynamic Contrast and Dynamic Tone Mapping should remain off. But as with using a gamma of 2.2 for SDR, if you view TV in a bright room, you may want to use Dynamic Tone Mapping, as it will lift the average picture level - thought I would still not recommend using Auto Dynamic Contrast.

On the motion settings, I would recommend leaving them all off, with the exception of Cinema Screen - this setting allows for proper 24fps playback.
 

1am7h30n3

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Thanks, will compare what you've said with my settings when I have the tv/settings in front of me. My lighting is dim, so I'll have a look at the 2.4 gamma then.

Would it be OK to run permanently with game optimizer on for video and game content from PC? I've turned off the special features inside the game optimizer menu, I can't remember what they are off the top of my head, but relating to dark scene brightness etc.
 

KenMasters

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1am7h30n3 said:
Would it be OK to run permanently with game optimizer on for video and game content from PC? I've turned off the special features inside the game optimizer menu, I can't remember what they are off the top of my head, but relating to dark scene brightness etc.

Game mode isn't great for video content as you won't be able to view 24fps content natively - instead it'll be converted to 60Hz, which causes judder. If you're not sensitive to it, then it's fine, but otherwise you'd need to switch to one of the film modes (assuming your PC outputs content at the correct framerate as well).

As for the features of the Game Optimiser menu, some are very useful depending on your use case. If you're using VRR, the TV's black level will drift, the black stabiliser setting allows you to tweak the low level picture to correct for it as best you can.

The Low Latency mode will run 60Hz games at 120Hz, so input times will be significantly reduced (as you receive frames sooner than you would otherwise).

The HGiG setting in the general game menu is also useful for games with HDR calibration screens. It defeats the TV's own tone-mapping so that it doesn't interfere with the game settings (but should not be used with video content).
 
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