My Solar install

shorai

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I think your nickname should be 'kat'. You've used up a few.:)

I found it easier to convince my wife that load sheding was a time to cuddle up in bed.

We now look at the schedule with glee. ;)
 

Nico V

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Hi Gents

Call me an opportunist if you will, but I would regret not doing this now.
Just putting it out there that we specialise in installations of backup power, ranging from domestic internet UPS' to high-end solar-fed off-grid systems and averything inbetween.
PM me if you have a requirement that we can help you with.
 

Family_Dog

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the room was now quite dark I recall, but proceeded to bite onto the other end of the now plugged in flex to strip the insulation as I had no tools. It was at that moment I knew I fcuked up…. As my roommate walked in switching the light on. An almichty bright and loud flash , and the complex mains tripped leaving all dark. When eventually the lights was restored, my face was that green yellow copper blue colour of copper. One of my front teeth are cracked till today.

So you could be referred to as a *BRIGHT SPARK *!

Reminds me of a youngster I knew who wondered what would happen to a 250V 0.47uF Cap if he connected it to the 220v AC mains. So he connected it with some ripcord to a 15A wall plug, but had the foresight to lay it in the centre of the bedroom carpet. Well, he found out what happens after he switched the AC Mains on - the carpet has a beautiful burnt mark to this day where the cap exploded to smithereens. No, this was not me.

But what I did do, I saved up my measly pocket money when I was knee-high to a grasshopper and bought a fancy little Analog multimeter, cost me 5/6d at that time which was huge bucks for an 8 year-old boy. First thing I did was to measure the AC Mains voltage, because that is what you do when no one is home to hassle you. The meter worked perfectly and measured the correct voltage. I then wondered what the 100mA current input would do when connected across the AC mains... I found out - BAM! But after this, the meter still worked perfectly for resistance, AC & DC voltage readings, but not so lekker on current ranges anymore.

-F_D
 

greatwhite

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@greatwhite same this side like the other guys. I got a 6kw as backup but never used it really before. It's there for when the "poef" really hits the fan. So far with our rainy days in cape town my 35kwh storage worked good. I want to add a nother 10kwh storage on that just for incase and another 2.5kw on my 10kw array on the north side.

Oooooo yes, join energytalk.co.za , you will get way more better responds from there. Lekker bunch of guys there. Sarel is there to.
I've never had to use the the generator either since going solar - just configure the inverters to start pulling in grid power at a higher battery SoC if there is high load shedding as a precautionary measure so there is extra battery reserve (takes 30 seconds I guess). When there has been a major power outage, I have been lucky thus far that the sun is about, so as long I (and the family) aren't wasteful, there is enough battery capacity to cover us at all times. I'm not sure how long my luck will hold though.

FWIW: I am also considering getting another battery to up us from 32kWh of storage to 38kWh, but getting a widget to integrate the generator and charge the batteries should, I would have thought, be a lot more cost effective and add greater flexibility/depth to the system. Spending a whole pile of cash on something that has a minimal duty cycle doesn't make sense, but I would definitely like to have a belt to go with the braces.

Re energytalk.co.za - thanks
 

Sarel.wagner

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Integrating generator would be cheaper yes, as long as it’s not used. Running costs, over time, will likely exceed cost of battery. You can calculate depending on how much battery you use, ever increasing cost of fuel ⛽️ and how many times you will like have to use the genset. Or heck, the convenience of not having to use the genset may be enough motivation to pay for extra 🔋

Groetnis
 

DACMan1

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Integrating generator would be cheaper yes, as long as it’s not used. Running costs, over time, will likely exceed cost of battery. You can calculate depending on how much battery you use, ever increasing cost of fuel ⛽️ and how many times you will like have to use the genset. Or heck, the convenience of not having to use the genset may be enough motivation to pay for extra 🔋
That and the fact that most people don't consider the servicing cost of a generator. Which leads to replacement cost, that they also don't consider...
 

greatwhite

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Integrating generator would be cheaper yes, as long as it’s not used. Running costs, over time, will likely exceed cost of battery. You can calculate depending on how much battery you use, ever increasing cost of fuel ⛽️ and how many times you will like have to use the genset. Or heck, the convenience of not having to use the genset may be enough motivation to pay for extra 🔋

Groetnis
Running the generator is a last resort, but on the days where there is no sun and municipal/Eskom power in not available for an extended period because they have (again) broken something and you need some power to keep at least the basics running (freezer, fridge, hifi ;)) then a generator becomes a useful tool. Also, hopefully, by charging the batteries, the genset is kept at a more optimal load and the batteries take the load fluctuation and stalling and frequency changes on the genset are mitigated as well.

For me, at least, operating cost is not the issue. If the above scenario happens once or perhaps twice a year and the on those rare occasions I spend a few hundred Rand on fuel but save a few thousand in freezer food and also don't risk damage to electrical equipment with the 'dirty' direct supply from the genset, its a fair deal. No reasonable number of batteries will sustain you for a few consecutive days with concurrent power outage and rain.

That and the fact that most people don't consider the servicing cost of a generator. Which leads to replacement cost, that they also don't consider...
Fair point, but most of these midget gensets can be self serviced in short order. Oil change 1l 10w40 and cleanable filters - had my Ryobi since before 2010 (I know I watch some of the world cup on is, but don't remember when I got it exactly). Still going

The 100kVA set at the office on the other hand - on that you are exactly right. Should have its own line on the income statement. :cautious:
 
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