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Aluminium cutting, finishing, and anodising

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kolakidd:
I was wondering if anyone new a place that could do aluminium laser or water jet cutting, finishing (as in de-burring, brushing or bead blasting), and anodising. Probably, the most important bit - by a place that is okay dealing with hobbyists who do one-off pieces, and don't go ape with pricing, and actually care about how they package and hand the stuff over to you - Seriously the last on kills me, the amount of times I have received stuff that has been badly scratched in handling post machining just kills me.

I have professional level skill in industrial design, and providing files and drawings for the process, so I don't need any information on that.

I normally just get water jet cutting done, and then do a hand clean-up and manual brush finish, and spray with a clear coat. The issue that I have though is that it's good, but never perfect.

Skylar:
You will probably not find a turn-key solution - as in, all of it done by one company - and to the standards that you expect. So best is to find a few good companies who are experts in their respective fields.

You don't mention where you are located, and I'm a relatively new member here - so wouldn't know automatically. However, if you're not close to JHB, but willing to courier the stuff, I can recommend an excellent anodizing company.

Designed Anodizing is run by owner Derick Espach. www.designedanodizing.co.za

pwatts:
With the experience I've had so far, just give up especially on the anodizing. Look at Europe or China.

Schalk:

--- Quote from: pwatts on October 04, 2021, 08:54:06 AM ---With the experience I've had so far, just give up especially on the anodizing. Look at Europe or China.

--- End quote ---

True, that's why I have chosen the Ceracote route. Once a piece is ruined during anodizing, you might as well junk it. The surface layer actually modifies slightly due to the current and then it becomes a nightmare. Reworking never gets it to be virgin anymore. Ceracote not liked universally though.

naboo:

--- Quote from: Schalk on October 04, 2021, 02:20:27 PM ---True, that's why I have chosen the Ceracote route. Once a piece is ruined during anodizing, you might as well junk it. The surface layer actually modifies slightly due to the current and then it becomes a nightmare. Reworking never gets it to be virgin anymore. Ceracote not liked universally though.

--- End quote ---
Any recommendations for the Ceracote, oom Schalk?

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