Author Topic: Quote of the Day  (Read 16294 times)

Offline BJ

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Quote of the Day
« on: July 24, 2020, 04:12:00 PM »
So we have Joke of the Day, Pic of the Day....
How about Quote of the Day

There are some great inspirational Ones by Famous and Anonymous alike...

Let's share

I will kick off with this One:

" ... avoid people who play victim of problems that they have created..."
Anonymous

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Shunyata - See No Evil; Hear No Evil

Offline chrisc

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Re: Quote of the Day
« Reply #1 on: July 24, 2020, 05:07:33 PM »
I'm a William Shakespeare fan, and have repeated so many quotes of his, that they are not so inspiring any more, so mathematics instead

So:  "Millions saw the apple fall, but Newton asked why"

— Bernard Baruch, American financier and philanthropist
Music is the shorthand of emotion

Offline JonnyP

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Re: Quote of the Day
« Reply #2 on: July 24, 2020, 05:53:17 PM »
One of my favourites as it was effectively telling the authorities to take a flying leap at a rolling doughnut:

‘Eppur si muove” - Galileo

Basically translates to albeit it still moves, this is what he said immediately after being forced to recant the blasphemy that the Earth moves around the Sun and not vice versa which the Vatican wanted to keep pushing for reasons of the usual human condition.  The said condition being believing that as they were in charge, what they said had to ALL be taken as the word of the divine.  A bit like some governments!
When the sun is dying, we'll cross the causeway of no memory.....

Offline Trompie67

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Re: Quote of the Day
« Reply #3 on: July 25, 2020, 07:23:20 AM »
I'm a fan of ancient Roman quotes - Marcus Aurelius in particular.

This is not from him though, but from Roman General Vegetius (Publius Flavius Vegetius Renatus).

The original phrase was "Igitur qui desiderat pacem, praeparet bellum." which translates to "Therefore let him who desires peace get ready for war".

It is most often abbreviated to "Si vi pacem para bellum" - translates to "If you want peace, prepare for war".
"Trumpets are a bit more adventurous; they're drunk! Trumpeters are generally drunk. It wets their whistle."
Paul McCartney

With thanks to F_D for this pearl of wisdom!

Offline Phase

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Re: Quote of the Day
« Reply #4 on: July 25, 2020, 07:41:06 AM »
So we have Joke of the Day, Pic of the Day....
How about Quote of the Day

There are some great inspirational Ones by Famous and Anonymous alike...

Let's share

I will kick off with this One:

" ... avoid people who play victim of problems that they have created..."
Anonymous

Sent from my SM-G950F using Tapatalk

When duly warned, stay well away!

Thanks Ben, lesson well learnt!

Offline BJ

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Re: Quote of the Day
« Reply #5 on: July 25, 2020, 08:03:38 AM »
My Daughter is Mark Twain fanatic.....

So she brushed off well onto me over the years





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Offline Thys

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Re: Quote of the Day
« Reply #6 on: July 25, 2020, 08:25:42 AM »
It is most often abbreviated to "Si vi pacem para bellum" - translates to "If you want peace, prepare for war".

The anti-Vietnam war protesters in the late sixties had a somewhat different view, something along the lines of 'Making war for peace is like screwing for virginity'

Offline Agaton Sax

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Re: Quote of the Day
« Reply #7 on: July 25, 2020, 12:25:51 PM »
I'm a fan of ancient Roman quotes - Marcus Aurelius in particular.

This is not from him though, but from Roman General Vegetius (Publius Flavius Vegetius Renatus).

The original phrase was "Igitur qui desiderat pacem, praeparet bellum." which translates to "Therefore let him who desires peace get ready for war".

It is most often abbreviated to "Si vi pacem para bellum" - translates to "If you want peace, prepare for war".

I loved Latin. Every Monday we were told: "Thursday is named ofter the Norse God of thunder so it is "Thors Day" So on Wednesday you are writing a test and if you don't get full marks,on Thor's day you shall get dondered." It never happened ,instead we sat for hours awe struck with stories of battles and murders and shenanigans of life 2000 years ago.

Like my father and his father  we studied Latin through English medium. This makes sense as English ,like French, Italian and Spanish  derived from Latin. When we were in standard 9 we were suddenly forced to study Latin in Afrikaans. This made absolutely no sense as Afrikaans is a Germanic language and therefore has no correlation at all with Latin. The much loved fierce little man with the huge moustache gave way to a beautiful young lady we all fell in love with but with it our love of Latin,and our marks, died.

semper in excretia sumus, solim profundum variat
« Last Edit: July 25, 2020, 12:32:36 PM by Agaton Sax »

Offline chrisc

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Re: Quote of the Day
« Reply #8 on: July 25, 2020, 04:31:23 PM »
I used to give talks to school-leavers a few years back on economics and entrepreneurship and a favourite Italian banking proverb made sense, if you think about it - the value of compound interest

"Money makes money, and the money money makes, makes more money"
Music is the shorthand of emotion

Offline El Sid

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Re: Quote of the Day
« Reply #9 on: July 25, 2020, 06:45:04 PM »
I loved Latin. Every Monday we were told: "Thursday is named ofter the Norse God of thunder so it is "Thors Day" So on Wednesday you are writing a test and if you don't get full marks,on Thor's day you shall get dondered." It never happened ,instead we sat for hours awe struck with stories of battles and murders and shenanigans of life 2000 years ago.

Like my father and his father  we studied Latin through English medium. This makes sense as English ,like French, Italian and Spanish  derived from Latin. When we were in standard 9 we were suddenly forced to study Latin in Afrikaans. This made absolutely no sense as Afrikaans is a Germanic language and therefore has no correlation at all with Latin. The much loved fierce little man with the huge moustache gave way to a beautiful young lady we all fell in love with but with it our love of Latin,and our marks, died.

semper in excretia sumus, solim profundum variat

To be pedantic (which I am - sorry) English is actually a Germanic language - the name being derived from the Angles, one of the Germanic tribes that settled in England after the Romans left. Old English like Beowulf looks just like German. Think of the sentences "my pen is in my hand" and "my hand is in warm water" which mean virtually the same thing in English and Afrikaans. However, English has been greatly influenced by Latin (as the language of learning and religion for centuries) and French when the Normans ruled, so it has many words from those languages. English has always been and is still a complete slut of a language which just gobbles up words from any other language as it suits.

Apologies for pointless digression. Quote: "There goes El sid again....."
« Last Edit: July 25, 2020, 06:47:22 PM by El Sid »

Offline Agaton Sax

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Re: Quote of the Day
« Reply #10 on: July 25, 2020, 07:17:57 PM »
To be pedantic (which I am - sorry) English is actually a Germanic language - the name being derived from the Angles, one of the Germanic tribes that settled in England after the Romans left. Old English like Beowulf looks just like German. Think of the sentences "my pen is in my hand" and "my hand is in warm water" which mean virtually the same thing in English and Afrikaans. However, English has been greatly influenced by Latin (as the language of learning and religion for centuries) and French when the Normans ruled, so it has many words from those languages. English has always been and is still a complete slut of a language which just gobbles up words from any other language as it suits.

Apologies for pointless digression. Quote: "There goes El sid again....."

On my word. So English is Germanic. What is Afrikaans then because the way we talks Inglish so deliciously surely means they can't be related op enige manier? And Dutch? The way my mother in law converses in English  is really fun to experience.

 For us 16 year old boys,even as stoere Vrystaat stock, the Latin tenses in English made sense (after a good few Thor's Days) but the Latin tenses in Afrikaans were just plain hilarious.

Offline JonnyP

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Re: Quote of the Day
« Reply #11 on: July 25, 2020, 07:50:30 PM »
As an Englishman I’m always happy that my mother tongue is a free for all from languages across the European spectrum.  As a moonraker I enjoy the local dialect even more (particularly its boisterousness).  Here’s a short sample (from whence we gets oor name):

Down Vizes way zom years agoo,
When smuggal'n wur nuthen new,
An people wurden nar bit shy,
Of who they did their sperrits buy.
In a village liv'd a publican,
Whi kept an Inn, The Pelican,
A man he wur, a man a merrit
An his neam wur Ikey Perritt.
Ael roun about tha country voke
Tha praise of thease yer landlard spoke;
Var wen any on'em wur took bad,
They knaw'd wur sperrits could be had;
An daly it wur nice an handy,
At tha Pelican to get yer brandy.
Twer zwold as chep as tis in Vrance,
Tho a course, twer done in iggerance.
One winter, Crismis time about,
Thease lanlords tubs as ael ran out.
Zays he, this yer's a purty goo,
Var mwore what ever shall I do;
Thie smugglin Zam's a purty chap,
Ta lave I here wieout a drap;
An wen a promised dree months back,
A hooden vail ta bring me whack.
Bit praps tha zizevoke voun his trail,
An med a pop'd inta jail,
Howsemdever, I'll zen and zee,
Ta marrer wats become a he.
Zoo nex day at nite he off did start,
Two girt chaps wie a donkey cart.
Ta Bristil town thay took ther way,
An got there as twer gettin day;
Tha smugglers house tha zoon voun out,
An tould'n wat they wur com about.
Ael rite, zays he, I've plenty bye,
Bit we mist keep a cuteish eye,
Var tha zize voke, they be in tha watch,
An two or dree have lately cotch.
Zoo tell woold Perritt thats tha razin
I coudden zen avore ta pleaz un.
Soo wen twur dark thase smuggler bwold,
Got dree tubs vrim a zacrit hould;
An unobsarved he purty smart,
Zoon clap'd em in tha donkey cart;
An tha top a covered up we hay,
Then zent tha chaps an cart away;
Ael droo tha streets quite zaef an zound,
Thay zoon jog'd out a Bristil town.
An vore tha vull moon ad rose,
To ther neative pleace, wur drawin close;
Wen to ther girt astonishment,
Thay met wie a awkurd accident,
In passin auver Cannins Brudge,
Tha stubborn donkey hooden budge;
Tha chaps thay leather'd well his back,
Bit a diden keer var ther attack;
Bit jibb'd an beller'd, shook his mean
Then kick'd bouth shafts right off za clane.
Up went tha cart, tha tubs vill out,
An in tha road zood roll'd about;
An vore tha chaps cood ardly look,
Ael dree ad roll'd straite in tha brook.
Well here's a purty goo zays one,
Why will, wat ever's to be done?
I'd like ta kill thic donkey quite,
If thee wurst, zays Tom, tid zar un rite.
Doost knaa wat tha matter wur?
I thinks a got a vorester;
Var I nevir knaw'd un hack like this,
Unless zummit wur much amiss.
Look at un now he's in a scare,
An gwain as hard as he can tare;
We bouth shafts danglin on tha groun,
A wunt stop till he gets wom I'm bown.
Zoo let un, I dwoant keer a snap,
Var then thay'll gace thease yer mishap;
An zen zumbiddy on tha road,
Ta help ess get wom saef tha load.
Bit zounds, while thus we do delay,
Tha tubs, begar, ull swim away;
We mist get em out at any price,
Tho' the water be as cwoold as ice.
Dwoant stan geapin zo, var goodness zeak,
Run to thic rick an vind a reak;
I thinks that I can reak em out,
Var ther thay be swimmin about.
Two reaks wur got, an then thaese two
Did reak an splaish we much ado;
Bit nar a tub diden lan,
Thay hooden zeem ta com ta han.
Zays Tom, I'm tired a tha job,
An hooden a tuck un var ten bob;
I ad a mine ta let em goo,
An zoo I will if thee hoot to.
Get out, girt stup, we mist get in,
Tho we do get wet ta tha skin.
Till never do ta let em be,
Zo tuck thee pants up roun thee knee.
Tha chaps then took tha water bwould,
Tho thay wur shram'd ni we tha could;
An jist as thay did heave one out,
Ael at once a feller loud did shout--
HEL'OH, me lads, wat up to there,
NIGHT POACHERS, ah, if teant I swear.
Let goo, zays Will, I'm blow'd if tent,
Vizes excizemen on tha scent;
Push off tha tub var goodness zeak,
Get out tha brook, teak hould a reak;
Reak at tha moon a shinin zee,
An dwoant thee spake, I'll tackle he,
Bit av ad a mishap as ya see.
Comin frum Vize we donkey cart,
On tha bridge tha donk mead zudden start;
An jirk'd, an jib'd, then gied a kick,
An het bwouth shafts off purty quick.
Out went our things wich as ya zees,
Lays ael about, an yer's a cheese;
He roll'd rite on straite in thease brook,
An Tom's a reakun vor'un look!
Tha Zizeman swallered ael o't in,
An ta zee Tom reakun, gun ta grin,
Girt vool, zays he, as true's I'm barn,
Why that's tha moon, thee beest reakun vor'n
An then a busted out agean,
An zed of ael, that beat all clean;
Ta zee a crazy headed coon,
Reak at the shadder of the moon.
Will wink'd at Tom, Tom wink'd at Will,
Ta zee how nice he'd took tha pill;
Ah, zur, you med laff as long as ya please,
Bit we be zure it be a cheese.
Zee how he shows hisself za plain,
Com Tom, lets reak vor he again.
Zo slap an dash went on reakin,
While Zizeman he var vun wur sheakin;
An off a went houlden his zide,
Var longer there a cooden bide.
We grinnin his eyes did auverflow,
Ta zee thay chaps a reakin zo;
An ta think that now he'd tould em zo,
Tha girt vools hooden ther frake vergo.
Zoo up a got upon his hoss,
An as tha brudge a went across,
He zet up another harty grin,
Wen a look'd an zeed em bouth get in;
An zed girt vools till zar em rite,
If thay da ketch ther deaths ta nite.
Bit wen he ad got clane away,
Tha tubs wur got wieout delay;
And hid away, quite zeaf and zoun,
Var a dark nite wen tha moon wur down.
Then at the Pelican thease chaps,
Purty zoon wur tellen ther mishaps;
Bit ael ther troubles they vergot,
Wen they'd emptyied well tha landloards pot,
An wen he a coose did pay em well
Thease little stowry not ta tell;
Zo wen tha Zizemin nex did com,
Woold Perritt he a coose wur mum.
An in a glass did jine wie glee,
Wen Zizemin twould tha tale ta he;
Bit he laff'd mwore wen zeaf one nite
Tha tubs wur brought wom snug an tite;
An many a bumper went a round,
To think thay'd beat tha Zizemin zound.
Bit he tha tale did zoon let out
To ael the countery roun about;
An to thease day, people da teeze,
All Wilsheer voke about tha cheese.
Bit tis thay as can avourd ta grin,
To zee ow nice a wur took in.
Zoo wen out thease county you da goo,
An voke da poke ther vun at you;
An caal ee a girt Wilsheer coon,
As went a reakun var tha moon.
Jist menshin thease yer leetle stowry,
And then bust out in ael yer glowry,
That yer smeart Excisemin vresh vrum town,
Wur took in wie a Wilsheer clown.
When the sun is dying, we'll cross the causeway of no memory.....

Offline JonnyP

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Re: Quote of the Day
« Reply #12 on: July 25, 2020, 08:05:28 PM »
To use more modern parlance:

TL:DR version

Places in Wiltshire at the time were getting booze delivered by bootleggers and smugglers because the taxes were too high for the local people.  A famous landlord had a smuggling ring going on to beat the taxes and bring in booze (Ikey Perritt with his accomplices Tom and Will).  They had the booze part way there when the taxmen (excise men) caught up with them (the poem above also blames the donkey for being stubborn and the barrels ending up in the pond - that’s the Devizes version, I was brought up on the Draycott version of the same story, both featured Devizes excise men).  So they weighted down the barrels and hid them in a pond, donned local farmer outfits and started raking the pond surface.  The taxmen asked what they were doing, they responded that they were raking the reflection of the moon to gather cheese because that was what the moon was made of.  Taxmen decided they must be stupid country folk and left to find the smugglers, they used the rakes to retrieve the barrels then continued on to Bristol (some versions, Swindon area others, London in a few, Devizes in others) with them safe in the knowledge that the taxmen were ahead of them and therefore beaten.

Final edit:  as with all folk tales there are many versions.  Whilst editing the above précis I have been happily recalling the versions I heard from grandparents, parents, other relatives, publicans and through local newspapers.  I expect there are many versions I haven’t heard, but one thing that is always clear is that Wiltshire folk are Moonrakers and we beat dem excise men!
« Last Edit: July 25, 2020, 08:22:06 PM by JonnyP »
When the sun is dying, we'll cross the causeway of no memory.....

Offline TimbaLand

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Re: Quote of the Day
« Reply #13 on: July 25, 2020, 08:24:45 PM »
So we have Joke of the Day, Pic of the Day....
How about Quote of the Day

There are some great inspirational Ones by Famous and Anonymous alike...

Let's share

I will kick off with this One:

" ... avoid people who play victim of problems that they have created..."
Anonymous

Sent from my SM-G950F using Tapatalk

Are you talking about the ANC and DA 🤣🤣
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Offline kenvanraas

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Re: Quote of the Day
« Reply #14 on: July 25, 2020, 08:49:31 PM »
^^^ Are you talking about the ANC and DA or some people with Turntables  :point: