Author Topic: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project  (Read 1413 times)

Offline mygoggie

Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project
« Reply #45 on: May 22, 2020, 10:38:55 PM »
Were did I leave off? Oh yeah, I just removed the compound slide.

Our time travel time frame of current time has now reached the few threads back's future travel time frame. So, we should be meeting ourselves now!  :rubhands: They say that if you meet yourself in the same time frame, do not hug each other as you will remove the time datum and both of you will disappear. How do the scientists know this? Have they tried touching themselves? If so, and they disappeared, it must be the truth, but how can they then be writing about this truth? So they must be serving us a lie as the truth. What about all the other things that these liars then could be serving us as the truth? This theorem of mine therefore proofs that all scientists must be politicians. All politicians cannot be scientists as they already know and orate everything as the holy truth and we have just proven that scientists cannot be truthful. So scientists can be politicians, but politicians cannot be scientists. Food for thought!

Onto removing the cross slide while keeping one eye out for myself.  :faint:

I removed the cross-slide screw's nut's bolt (that is a lot of 's es <-- how do you spell esses?) at the back and removed the cross-slide screw. It is that long thin steel wormy thing that pulls or pushes the cross-slide when you turn da' handle.

Now the cross-slide must pull off the saddle. OK, let me try again. It is stuck! Trying to find new words as I promised myself I will not swear on the holy Saturday. I cannot find any new words and gave up. That is on trying to remove the cross-slide.... Coffee time. Catch some vitamin D in the sun. The scientists say Antie Corona does not like Vitamin D ... hmmm have they asked her? Refer to my theorem.

BTW, I have another theorem that is absolutely proven whenever I drive at dusk. It goes as follows: "The darker the colour of the approaching car, the greater the chance that its lights will not be switched on." This is the truth so I cannot be a scientist. OK, also politics can then never be for me...  :angel:

So sitting in the sun catching some D's... Brain says: "Make a puller and pull that speed gear off" and off I went to a few posts back in time. And now I am back. Gear pulled, all parts repaired. Warping ahead from back there in time we are here again. Are you still with me? Welcome to mygoggie's world of logic!

Time to pull the ON/OFF and brake handle. The handle is located on a shaft that protrudes at the back and then bottom of the headstock. On the shaft is an arm which is a bit hidden. In this arm is a grub screw. On this grub screw is a flea and on the flea a bacteria. It is the bacteria on the flea on the grub screw .... ... .. and the tree in the hole and the green grass grows around it ...  :whistler: (With reference to a popular old folk Afrikaans song about the hole in the ground).

Once the grub screw located in the arm on the shaft as found at the back of the headstock was loosened and removed, I could simply pull on the handle and it came out easily. Unbelievable and an unbelievably long confusing sentence.










By now Brain has told me how to solve the stuckup cross-slide. Take her down Pappa, take her down with force. So I took two slide clamps, hooked these onto the back of the cross-slide and the front of the apron and put some tension on the cross-slide.





It took some force, but she came off. The gibs were jammed with gunk and prevented a smooth slide.





You see, sometimes force does work. But you need to delicately apply it without the person or item you apply it too, realises it. Sounds like Antie Corona's non-scientist friends in the higher escalons of our social levels.  :whip:

Next in line was the saddle locking clamp that locks the carriage in place. Looking at the parts list, wrong type of bolt. OK, sigh. The Brutish Butcher was here. Removing the bolt and the locking clamp I could see he truly was here.





How is this for locating a threaded hole? You measure incorrectly, drill in the wrong place, tap it and then ... it does not fit. Easy fix, simply grind the block of steel away till it fits. The bolt will grip in air. No issues.





OK, let's try the carriage way now. Still not moving ...  So I undid the cap scews holding the apron to the saddle. This should allow the gears on the inside to drop away from the lead screw (the long threaded bar thingy at the top running all along the lathe). The apron dropped a bit and the gears felt loose. Let's try moving the carriage. Aha, it moves something like 2" at a time. Since the lathe is imperial, maybe we should stick to imperial measurements.  :thinking: Nope, I am not British. The carriage moved about 50mm.

Now, how to get the carriage or maybe only the saddle removed? It will not slide past the tail end of the lathe as the lead screw support is in the way. Secondly we also have the problem that the saddle and apron (bolted together forming the carriage) do not want part ways.

Back to Mr DuckDuckGo ... and some coffee. Sorry no more D's. It was past sunset.

The solution it seems is to remove the gap piece in the bed and slide the carriage to the left over the now large gap. The writer states that the saddle gibs should now be free from the underside of the bed top as there is no bed underside in the gap. OK, I get it. A gap by definition is void of anything so the saddle can simply be lifted up through the void.  :roll:

Onto removing the two visible bolts I installed when lifting the lathe. Do not ask me where I safely stored the cap screws. I have absolutely no idea.





OK, it does not move. Aha, two hidden cap screws on the left side of the gap piece.





With these out, the gap piece moved and I could remove it.

With 50mm bounces I moved the carriage over the larger gap. Double checked that is as close as possible to the headstock without jamming on it. Lifting the saddle resulted in the left hand side lifting and the right hand side looking at me as to say why should I move? Like my Chow-Chow: "You threw the ball, so go and fetch it yourself!"

The saddle remains stuck to the underside of the bed. New words were born ...

Now what now? I 50mm hopped the carriage to the centre of the lead screw to give me a balanced approach in finding a solution to the problem.

No beer, no coffee ... I had my limit of caffeine ... bring it on Bob Marley.

Only way out now was to start removing the lead screw and the round bar thingy with the slot in it below. That is called the feedshaft. At the moment it was only feeding my frustration.

I had enough and it was time to call it a night and give Brain some time to come up with a solution.
« Last Edit: May 22, 2020, 10:50:30 PM by mygoggie »
Herman

~ To heal the soul is to embark on a new journey. ~

Offline Family_Dog

Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project
« Reply #46 on: May 23, 2020, 09:18:53 AM »
Words fail me... but thank you for defining politicians!   :giggle:


-F_D



-Eric

That Guy in South Africa...
*************************************
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/vintage_tube/
*************************************

Offline mygoggie

Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project
« Reply #47 on: May 25, 2020, 12:28:13 AM »
Onto trying to get the feedshaft and the leadscrew removed.

I did not have the correct C-spanner to remove the lock nuts at the left hand side of the leadscrew. I dug around in my toolbox and found that the piston ring compressor's key fits perfectly in the slot.





I will rather punch against this key before I hit the slotted nut. It has already been damaged quite severely so I did not want to cause more damage.  Two very sharp punches and she was loose. The key to hitting something to get it loose is not to use force. Do not try to hit hard as you will create flying spanners and bent stuff and most probably blood flowing. Simply hit it with a very sharp motion. Not a good looking "sharp" but a very quick flick of the arm. You want momentum to loosen the item. Not force.

On this topic. Momentum is the product of the mass of the hammer times the velocity it is traveling at. The formula is as follows:




And the force applied to the object that you hit is the differential of the momentum with regards to the period of time during which the force is applied.




This means a sharp blow will apply a lot more force in a short period of time than when you hit slower and try to hit hard. A simple applied mathematics lesson!

The other nut of the locking pair then simply can be unscrewed as well.

OK, the lead screw is now loose. How to remove it remains the question? Tugging on it did nothing. Pulling it with the 50mm jumping carriage did nothing. Another peek showed another collar on the inner side of the gearbox wall. It has a grub screw on it so time to loosen that and see what happens.





Nothing ...  :Ooooooh:





I double checked the support on the tailstock end if there is maybe a locking something there. Nope, nothing. Just an empty hole. Something is  missing from the hole, but nothing in there for now is good. Anyone knows what must be in the hole? There is nothing on the parts lists to indicate what goes into the hole.

At this time Brain spoke up and said: "Leave it be". So I left it to be.

Moving to the feedshaft. At the tailstock end there are two collars.





I loosened the grub screws in each and removed the external one. I must remember this is the external one, so I took a photo thereof.





Back to the gearbox end of the shaft. I cannot find anything holding it in place. Looking closer I could see "someone" damaged the edge of the feedshaft trying to force a screwdrive or similar inappropriate tool into the minute slot. Maybe this "somebody" had a point ... So I put the external end collar back onto the feedshaft, but left enough room between it and the support to allow me to insert an aluminium bar in the gap. Applying a bit of leverage made the feedshaft move to the right.  :Whoohoo:





 :nono: The screwdriver is just to show the gap ...

A tug on the shaft and out it popped and "clink" I heard. I hate that sound! Something dropped and I have no idea what. Can you see it??





Turns out there are two balls located at the gearbox end of the feedshaft that locks the shaft into the gearbox shaft. Alas no springs behind the balls, so I wonder how these balls could ensure a decent lock. Appears our friendly Brutish Butcher decided to dispose of the springs ... Anyway I will sort that out when I assemble the shaft again.





I read somewhere that you need to support the apron on blocks of wood when you pull the feedshaft as the carraige will now only hang from the leadscrew and will tilt suddenly forward. So I promptly did that. Hmmm ... remember the maths above. Sudden movement creates a lot of energy that needs to go somewhere. In this case towards bending the leadscrew.





Righty ho, and out she came. And promptly stuck to the underside of the shelf of the adjacent wood rack. Out came the crowbar and I moved the lathe back towards the wall to allow the feedshaft to be extracted. I carefully pulled the feedshaft and checking that it will not hit the shelf again I gave it a last pull to free it from the carriage way. It came free with a bit of effort and I hear a load "clunk" ...  :sweat:

Turning my head back to the carriage this greeted me ...





Apparently this thinghy is called a wormbox. It is not mentioned anywhere and nobody online has ever seen one on a Colchester Student before. So a new name was given to my lathe. It is now called the "Funny Student"  ... I do not think it is funny ...

An interesting last tidbit. What is the origin of the word "tidbit"? As I laid the two feedshaft collars next to each other to take a photo, I saw something very interesting.





Can you see it? Look closer and if you see it post the answer!




Herman

~ To heal the soul is to embark on a new journey. ~

Offline Family_Dog

Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project
« Reply #48 on: May 25, 2020, 08:34:34 AM »
I'm dof, all I see are two differently coloured grub screws, red for Port (or left), green for Starboard (or right).


-F_D



-Eric

That Guy in South Africa...
*************************************
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/vintage_tube/
*************************************

Offline mygoggie

Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project
« Reply #49 on: May 25, 2020, 09:35:23 AM »
I'm dof, all I see are two differently coloured grub screws, red for Port (or left), green for Starboard (or right).


-F_D

Not too dof ... so yes, someone marked the collars and that someone must have had a sailing or aviation background. I find that very interesting.
Herman

~ To heal the soul is to embark on a new journey. ~

Offline mygoggie

Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project
« Reply #50 on: May 25, 2020, 10:48:57 AM »
Someone on the other forum wanted to know what the wormbox does and if it is part of the thread dial indicator's operation. Here is my answer.

The thread dial indicator on this lathe sits on the left hand side of the carriage. Also unheard of ...





The wormbox has a few functions. I found an unknown of manual on a google drive which best describes the function of the wormbox.



Herman

~ To heal the soul is to embark on a new journey. ~

Offline mygoggie

Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project
« Reply #51 on: May 25, 2020, 10:37:24 PM »
So the feedshaft is removed and I still have no idea as to how the leadscrew is to be removed.

I watched the video again and the only real guidance there was how to remove the tumbler locating strip. It is that black metal strip full of holes I tried to loosen a few days back. The guy in the video showed he undid the cap screw by inserting the long side of Uncle Allen's key into it and turning it loose with the short side. He must be very very very strong ...

OK, let me show my strength...  :boxing:

If it breaks, it breaks is my motto now. So I took the longest ring spanner I had, and hooked it onto the long side (yes I am chicken Chuck) of Uncle Allen's key.





I took a deep breath and pulled the spanner. Nothing. I turned it until the key was bowing like a bow, ready to shoot an arrow into the wide yonder. Nothing. Stuff this I said and I pulled it some more and with a loud snap sound the spanner came free. What broke? Spanner is fine, Uncle Allen's key is fine and the cap screw looked like it turned!!  :2thumbs:

Its mate got the same treatment after cleaning the cap screw hole carefully. It tried to beat it's mate's releasing cry and came loose with an almighty snap sound.

The strip was still laying solidly in place. A tad lazy I if you ask me, so I gave it a bit of a tap with the dead blow hammer.  :whip:  It woke from it slumber with a slight sliding motion.





And out it came ...





The two spacers did not move, so I let them be as they could be part of the casing. A bit of time datum advancing proved that they are actually loose, but were just gummed into location. More later when this time meets future time.

What next? Nothing ... I simply had to find a way to get the leadscrew loose from the gearbox. I took a very strong light and looked carefully. On the left of the gearbox wall on the shaft that forms part of the leadscrew line is a slotted coller. It looked more or less the same as the two that were on the feedshaft and allowed me to gave you a practical mathematics lesson.

OK, my friend, if you are slotted, you must be able to turn. I took out a very goog quality screwdriver and gave it a firm sharp tap.  :yawn:  Yeah, OK ...





Low and behold, it moved! Tap, tap and more tap and then some more. Slowly the leadscrew moved towards the right until the nut unscrewed completely.






Once the nut was removed I could start moving the leadscrew towards the tailstock end.





It was a wiggle of the apron, the leadscrew, the apron, the leadscrew, the apron ... OK, you get the drift. A fine dance it was without stepping on each other's toes. When the fat lady sang, the apron was resting on the blocks, and the leadscrew was laying in a ditch at the back of the bed. What a night it was!  :be:

Finally I could start stripping the gearbox!  :Whoohoo:

Watching a few more videos on YouTube! I saw that there are grub screws in the vertical support sections of the gearbox. These hold the bushes in place. To remove the bushes, you need to remove the grub screws.

Can you see the grub screws?





No, neither can I. Seems like our Brutish Butcher was here ... "Hey, there are some grub screws left over!" ... "Well the lathe is working, so chuck them". Sounds familiar someone??

Moving onto the central vertical support. Yeah, there are the beauties!





And the left most support? Yebo yes!





Off we go to Uncle Allen to find one of his keys that will fit. Out came the grub screws.





There the sad family lies. Sorely missing two of their kind. The collars are the two end ones for the feedshaft. The ones with the nautical or aviation connection.





Next step. I want the bushes removed, so lets do that. Taking my aluminium rod I first tapped the central one out. It came out quite easily.





Then the right hand one.









Here they are. All strung up djou Honour.





Onto getting the middle shaft and gears off. This shaft is called the coneshaft. On the left is a collar with a grub screw which I promptly undid with the help of Uncle Allen.





I stuck a screwdriver between the collar and the edge of the shoulder of the shaft and gave it some leverage. It moved, no it did not! Looking closely I could see some thread! Aha, got you you sneaky  :angel:  Turning the collar with the Allen key







I could then simply pull the shaft to the right by hand. Weird feeling not to have to tap a shaft out!




Three shafts left!





Onto getting the left hand bottom one out. Hang on, looking at the parts list this appears to be one shaft that runs the length of the gearbox!





I moved the gears to the left and hello! A circlip appears.





And promptly breaks ... ai toggie.





OK, what now?





Watching the video it appears that you need to tap the shaft to the left hand side and it will take the bush with it, both moving together. So I started tapping and with almost no effort the bush started moving.





And promptly made a solid noise and refused to move. Hmmm ... time for some coffee ...

With some wisdom added to Brain, it seems like the small gear in the red shafty thingy is stuck on the shaft. So I knocked the shaft back a tiny bit and the gear could move. OK, time to remove you Mr Gear. No, not you Richard!





Thanks Mr Allen!  Ooops not so fast. That is a pin and not a grub screw! Let's tap you out Mr Pin.





With the gear removed, the red shafty thingy was free to allow the shaft to slide. Or is that now the other way round? The shaft free to slide?





Yes, purple gloves and grease do not go together? So why does the Doc put one on when he uses Vaseline ...  :thinking:

And out came the red shafty thingy. You need to move it as far to the left as possible and it will swivel enough in the right hand bush to be pulled forward on the left end.





That left the left middle shaft.  This is called the intershaft with 14 teeth. What a weird name. :nutter:





Coffee time ...  :thumbs:  Ha, Brain was well energised and I spotted the gear's secret quickly. An angled grub screw in the gear's collar. Uncle Allen helped us out quickly.





 By now I was used to tapping shafts to shift bushes. Tap it to the left, tap it to the left ... sounds like a kid's song.  :giggle:







And suddenly the gearbox was void and empty and the smell of old oil was all that remains ...

 :cleansound:
« Last Edit: May 25, 2020, 10:52:36 PM by mygoggie »
Herman

~ To heal the soul is to embark on a new journey. ~

Offline Family_Dog

Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project
« Reply #52 on: May 26, 2020, 08:19:01 AM »
I cannot wait until the re-assembly threads start being posted, particularly with the sourcing of some missing or broken parts being possibly unobtanium. But I am confident that between Coffee and the Brain (apologies to Pinky...), you will make a suitable plan!


-F_D



-Eric

That Guy in South Africa...
*************************************
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/vintage_tube/
*************************************

Offline mygoggie

Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project
« Reply #53 on: May 26, 2020, 08:31:24 AM »
I cannot wait until the re-assembly threads start being posted, particularly with the sourcing of some missing or broken parts being possibly unobtanium. But I am confident that between Coffee and the Brain (apologies to Pinky...), you will make a suitable plan!


-F_D


Aaah, Pinky and the Brain. One of my fav cartoons.

** Spoiler alert **
There are quite a few more of these dismantling threads to come ...
Herman

~ To heal the soul is to embark on a new journey. ~

Offline mygoggie

Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project
« Reply #54 on: May 26, 2020, 10:44:47 PM »
With the leadscrew removed I could finally slide the saddle off the bed at the tailstock end.

And there the saddle suddenly found itself upside down. Can you see the saddle front strip that made things a tiny tad difficult?





Time to remove the two cap screws that hold the saddle front strip down.





The saddle found itself stripped of the last part and it was time to store it for cleaning.

Onto attending to the two lonely gear shifting levers in the headstock. Carl has been cleaning and removing grease over a few days using a whole bale of rags and 3 liters of paraffin in the process. At long last we could see how to disassemble these. On this funny lathe, there is a nut on the underside of the vertical spindle that needs to be undone.







The spanner to use is a 13/16" AF and you will need a lot of patience to get the nut removed. There is not a lot of space to work with and you ideally need an offset spanner.  Remember that as the nut nears the end of the thread, you need to lift the handle assembly so that the nut is lifted away from the headstock bottom, allowing the spanner better turning room.





And there the headstock was ... void and empty and the smell of old oil, aaagh, I mean grease, was all that remains ...

Since I am now a wonder at removing bushes, I tackled the tailstock end support for the leadscrew and feedshaft.




Checking for grub screws that holds the bushes fast, I found nothing .... strange.  :thinking:

Check again Brain said. If it is too easy you have overlooked the obvious.  Murphey's Law #8 if I remember correctly. So what I thought earlier to be an empty hole in the support, in fact was hiding a grub screw.





Using my phone's camera, we spotted the bottom one as well! Took a bit of cleaning by feel, but we got the hole cleared for Uncle Allen's to do the removal.





A quick knock with the aluminium bar and there the rascals lay. Like two sweet little sleeping kids.







Just to make sure they behave Carl tied them up ... he was not taking any chances!  The grub screws went into the rag pocket to keep them company. Almost like a rag doll, come to think of it.





Finally .... There she stands. Stripped of all parts except the electrical motor. Time to reflect on what we have done!  :sweat:




Herman

~ To heal the soul is to embark on a new journey. ~

Offline d0dja

Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project
« Reply #55 on: May 27, 2020, 06:29:23 AM »
Nicely done.

In one of the pics I saw two screws and the spring that you'll have lying on your bench when it's reassembled. No, not going to tell you which ones.

To get out stuck capscrews, etc, not better to use an impact driver to provide more of a repeating impulse force than a hard twist? Impact driver, allan key socket.

Offline mygoggie

Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project
« Reply #56 on: May 27, 2020, 08:56:40 AM »
Nicely done.

In one of the pics I saw two screws and the spring that you'll have lying on your bench when it's reassembled. No, not going to tell you which ones.

To get out stuck capscrews, etc, not better to use an impact driver to provide more of a repeating impulse force than a hard twist? Impact driver, allan key socket.

Thanks for the comments!

Ai, now I need to go spring hunting ...

No way I could get an impact driver in there nor a key socket. The top of the toothy thing is below the shaft above it and also below the top of the gearbox. Impact was the way I wanted to do it. Secondly the cost of an imperial Allen key socket is something I had to consider as I had to go and find one in town. Rather break an Allen key of which I had two.

Herman

~ To heal the soul is to embark on a new journey. ~

Offline mygoggie

Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project
« Reply #57 on: May 27, 2020, 08:59:47 AM »
Does anyone have some Glyptal left over in a tin they can donate towards the project? I want to touch up the insides of the headstock and the gearbox with it.
Herman

~ To heal the soul is to embark on a new journey. ~

Offline mygoggie

Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project
« Reply #58 on: May 27, 2020, 10:51:15 PM »
I was watching SpaceX trying to launch the American astronauts. Poor weather won the day. Let's hold thumbs for Saturday!

So just a short update tonight. We left off with the lathe looking a bit barren.

Onto dismantling the pieces that can still be disassembled. The easiest one being the wormbox.





A first look, showed a major problem. Oval holes!  :Ooooooh: :faint:







The body of the wormbox is made from cast steel or cast iron. I am leaning towards cast iron as it needs to be softer than the feedshaft and the leadscrew. This will ensure that the wormbox will wear first and protect the leadscrew and feedshaft. A fact proven by the oval holes.

I will have to have the oval holes bored larger, plugs installed and new holes milled and reamed to final size.

The first step is to punch the pin from the wormgear.





This allows the shaft to be punched from the gear using my old faithful aluminium rod.





What a lot of gunk is present. The oil holes were also blocked ... ai ai.





Next step is to punch the shaft from the handle.





Pull the handle from the wormbox chassis. I was scared there is a massive spring behind the cam visible to the north of the handle, so I took it slowly.





Almost there!





And there we are. With the handle removed, I could pull the cam from its cylinder. Yes, I was right! There is a fat big spring in there, just waiting to be sprung loose and fly through space.





Remember the way the handle's shaft goes into the wormbox body. The end with the indent goes first.





That is the wormbox disassembled. While I was busy with the wormbox, Carl was still cleaning grease from the headstock. This time he was doing all the nooks and crannies using an old toothbrush and paraffin. Starting to look good!





Next in line is the apron. I will tackle that in the morrow.  :dop:  Oh heck, sorry guys!  :coffee:

Herman

~ To heal the soul is to embark on a new journey. ~

Offline mygoggie

Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project
« Reply #59 on: May 27, 2020, 11:17:26 PM »
I cannot wait until the re-assembly threads start being posted

-F_D

Just a teaser @Family_Dog ... quick grab my hand and let's jump forward in this thread's time to real time in today's time.

A few before and afters ...

The tumbler shifting arm cap.








The tumbler handle.











The screw cutting indicator dial. I forgot to take a before photo, but it was messed up.

The face smoothed as far as possible with three grits of diamond plates and ending with 1200 grit wet sanding paper.






All lettering done.





The cross-slide screw keep.







Happy @Family_Dog ?? OK, off you go, back to the thread's time datum. Say hi to Spock when you see him!
Herman

~ To heal the soul is to embark on a new journey. ~