Author Topic: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project  (Read 13227 times)

Offline mygoggie

Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project
« Reply #240 on: September 19, 2020, 06:10:20 PM »
All I had the energy for today was to take some dimensions of two Colchester taper attachment parts I have.

The bearing housing with dimensions.







The metric and imperial cross-slide screws with dimensions.








I also compiled these into two PDF files and uploaded some files to the Colchester group on groups.io. If you want to have a look click here.

Hopefully I will feel better tomorrow and can do some spraying of the sanded parts.  :coffee:


Herman

~ To heal the soul is to embark on a new journey. ~

  mygoggie's perfecture
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Offline Rnwza

Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project
« Reply #241 on: October 06, 2020, 12:41:57 PM »
I'm having withdrawal symptoms - miss my daily Colchester fix...when will we hear more @mygoggie :)

The suspense is killing me!
"Music is essentially useless. As life is." - George Santayana

Offline Family_Dog

Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project
« Reply #242 on: October 06, 2020, 03:37:39 PM »
Methinks Mygoggie is too busy filling with Polyfilla and grinding it smooth with toothpaste... sure he will reply as soon as he runs out of both items. His Pajero is broken (he should have bought a TOYOTA!!) and he is unable to get to the local supply store to purchase more of each.


-F_D



-Eric

That Guy in South Africa...
*************************************
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/vintage_tube/
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Offline mygoggie

Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project
« Reply #243 on: October 06, 2020, 06:26:40 PM »
Yeah, yeah @Family_Dog ...  every dog gets his day and a time traveling dog has everyday ...

Sorry guys, I have been sick, the Pajero broke and I am snowed under with work, something I am ever grateful for. Not nice having no income for months on end.

The Paj's bearings finally landed in SA yesterday and I can pick these up tomorrow. Then onto fixing the Paj and then I can work on the lathe again.
Herman

~ To heal the soul is to embark on a new journey. ~

  mygoggie's perfecture
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Offline mygoggie

Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project
« Reply #244 on: October 10, 2020, 09:33:41 PM »
This has been a hectic past three weeks. Simply been working day and night and had to really dig deep to keep my sanity. The amount of dumbfounding incompetence these days almost broke my spirit a few times.

So here we are, a rainy Saturday and what better to do than try and figure out where I left my garage.

A bit back and forth I and I actually managed to find an opening to the lathe portions. Searching between all the tools and Pajero parts, I finally traced the last piece of lathe I was working on. The lathe stand!

First things first was to get the air compressor going again. Last I left off where I broke the pressure switch housing when I replaced the pneumatic connector. It had tapered thread to lock into the body, and of course the body was made from junk scrap metal from the far east. It simply cracked the body apart and ensured a very leaky system.

A while back I stripped another compressor to use the air cylinder for the Pajero's onboard air. I fortunately kept the pressure switch and as normal, securely and safely packed it away so well that it took me a day to find! Long story short, Carl installed it for me. It worked but did not switch off at 7 bar. Just kept going steadily onwards to infinity and load bangs.

Adjusting the spring's tension took a few tries, but there we are. All good again!





Then it was onto the piece of lathe I managed to find! Sanding the stand with body filler that was now more than four weeks old! Not fun.





And two hours later done with 36 grit. This stuff is as hard as rock!





Onto 50 grit and banged knuckles ...





I tried with the orbital sander but the paper simply gums up and make sanding not effective. Doing 80 grit by sander and by hand ...







There we are done to 120 grit.





And seven and two quarter hours later done to 180 grit. Still a few spots to touch up but it looks a lot better!






I am suppose to start stripping the Pajero's transfer case tomorrow as the new bearings arrived yesterday. I think I need to cover all the exposed steel on the lathe stand first, so maybe I need to adjust my automotive ventures to a future date. You know, rust comes before oil and grease.

 :dop:
Herman

~ To heal the soul is to embark on a new journey. ~

  mygoggie's perfecture
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Offline mygoggie

Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project
« Reply #245 on: October 11, 2020, 09:46:03 PM »
This morning I saw a posting on the 4x4 site in the freebies thread. Pajero transfer case switches! Exactly what I need! The stealers will take 30 days to get these to SA at an horrendous price, so that was not really an option I wanted to choose. Someone else had called dibs on the job lot, but after a few back and forths, these switches were kindly donated to me! I am really so glad as with only one car, it is not easy to fix it when something this scarce breaks!

So the morning began with a good deed by kind Samaritans. Thanks guys!

This morning I started off with the lathe stand and doing the final layer of body filler. Alas, my usual enemy was doing its bit again in my garage.






Three weeks of not being used and this is the amount of rust on bare steel. Oh well, sanding pad here we go!

With that fixed it was onto skimming the sanded surfaces.







Almost all surfaces skimmed and waiting to be sanded.






And there we are! I am getting better and betterder on getting a smooth surface applied!

It was very very humid today and therefore the filler takes a while to get hard. It dries out but remains sticky, clogging the sandpaper. Best thing then is to leave it for a while or even overnight before sanding.





I decided I'd better get my hands onto the hanging beast and finish the drive side's difficult faces. A lot of sanding was to be done. I started off with the round surfaces.




Then it was the "impossible to reach with my handheld sanding block" surfaces. This little sanding stick thing is amazing! Luv it!





All done and time for a final skimming coat which took surprisingly long to apply.







And it was time to wait and for Sunday afternoon's 40 winks. Alas it took 60 minutes to complete the 40 winks ...  :facepalm:

I managed to do the basic shaping and surfaces to 120 grit before some friends arrived for dinner.





Tomorrow is office work again. I will try my best to get the beast and the stand finished over the next two days. Let's see!

 :dop:






Herman

~ To heal the soul is to embark on a new journey. ~

  mygoggie's perfecture
My wishlist

Offline mygoggie

Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project
« Reply #246 on: October 12, 2020, 08:19:16 PM »
This afternoon at 16h00 I had enough of office work. So I called it a day.

Onto sanding and beyond ...  :Whoohoo:

The beast's end needed a lot more of sanding. After an hour we are done down to 120 grit. All the spill overs sanded back and the curves more or less done.










Then it was time to sand to 180 grit and do the final shaping. Done!





Final touch up with filler done. Working with a hanging piece of metal is not easy. Your hand cannot get steady in respect to the surface and then add the curves in ...







Time to wait again ....

I gathered all the electrical motor components to start assembling it. Guess who made his visit .... the Freakin Rust Devil!! The surface was well oiled but alas over here the moist sea air has got no respect for oil.







Thank heavens this is not a crankshaft! I will get my usual scour pad and beeswax out and give the shaft a good rub down. Should be good to go for assembling then.

Till tomorrow  :dop:
Herman

~ To heal the soul is to embark on a new journey. ~

  mygoggie's perfecture
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Offline mygoggie

Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project
« Reply #247 on: October 13, 2020, 09:15:49 PM »
Here we are in tomorrow!  :rubhands: Welcome, welcome!

Time to remove the motor's rotor's shaft's rust <-- Is this good English? 's's's Reminds me of my uncle's Datsun! That car was scary fast.

Anyway onto proactive actions.

Some bee's wax, a scrubbing pad and a rusty rotor.





A bit of rubbing and then some more and there we are!





Next step is to start assembling. Which way should the rotor go? This way?





Or this way?





Fortunately I decided to start a thread about the restoration process. A bit of search revealed this interesting photo!





Difficult to believe this is the same motor!





With the orientation of the rotor figured out, it was time to clean the end caps.









The other end or side or whatever peace you wanna call it ...









This looks like those unboxing YouTube! videos you watch and the person describes the box, the labels and stickers on it, the way to open it and then has no clue as to what the thingy inside actually does.

The inside of the end caps still had some sand, gunk and paint on the contact edges. A bit of sanding with wet 800 grit quickly got the bearing face cleaned up. I used my favourite wetting agent that does not create any rust - Window Cleaner.







The Dremel tool with a brass brush made quick work of cleaning the lower bearing face.





And my old toothbrush was not far behind and made quick work of removing the sand!  :winkwink:





And there are the ladies in waiting.





The bearings to be installed in the end caps.





A close-up of the bearing number. Interesting is that this is the correct bearing to use in an electric motor. It achieves the correct ball clearances when heated by the working motor.





Then I started hunting for the screws, spring washer, retention plates. Well, it is in my garage! In the box with all the lathe parts. Will unpack that tomorrow. I must first write this post up!

 :dop:

Brain says  :coffee:
Herman

~ To heal the soul is to embark on a new journey. ~

  mygoggie's perfecture
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Offline mygoggie

Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project
« Reply #248 on: October 14, 2020, 10:30:49 PM »
Too much office work today. And almost no sleep as the Boss is ill.

That is life, you need to adapt to every moment and enjoy that moment. We only live once!

Brain says: "You are forgetting that time travel creates many moments to enjoy!"  :coffee:

Yeah, yeah ...

Onto restoration work. I did not have to dig too deeply as I had filed the bag with electrical motor goodies in its place. Yep, in the big black box.

All bolts and nuts present.





Old and new sorted. I have no idea what the small spring washer is doing here. It should be with the coolant pump! Maybe it was lonely and longed for the company of it's bigger Boet.





I could not remember which side the big Boet washer fits, so I had to delve through this thread. Aaah here we are!





It therefore must go on the drive pulley side.





Into the bearing's little nest it goes ...







I had no idea as to the correct installation sequence of bearings and end caps.  Brain chirped in: "When you have no idea, just take a random guess and start there." OK, OK, so I started off with driving the bearing into the drive pulley end.







Test fitting the end cap shows a very good fit.





I battled a bit to figure out how the bolt, nut and spring washer should be assembled. There was not enough space for the nut and spring washer in the recess.





Time to search through the thread again. Man I wrote a lot to date!  Here we are! Spring washer griping the bolt's head.





The fan end has two clamps that hold the bearing in place. I have never cleaned these, so I quickly dunked these and brushed them a bit to rid rust of the oil, grease and sand.





A trial run or three showed the way these must be installed.





Installed and tightened holding the very securely fitting bearing even more securely. Like my old mentor said: "Belt and braces!"





And there we hit a hurdle. The fan end bearing fits very tightly on the shaft and there is no way I can get it pressed in while the bearing is installed in the cap. So I disassembled all the my hard work of earlier. I removed the shaft and then pressed the bearings onto the shaft.





Then the fan side's end cap was knock onto the bearing until it seated solidly.





With the two bearing clamps once again securely holding the tightly fitting bearing, I assembled the shaft with fitted end cap into the motor body.





Then the drive end's end cape once again had to be assembled.





Some knocking later to get the bearing seated in the end cap, I could tighten the end cap holding bolts.





With both end caps securely fastened, it was time to install the fan. I firstly had to clean the fan and scrape all the rough nylon fan blade edges clean. A bit of scrubbing with my faithful old toothbrush and it was time to fit a clean fan.





The slotted spring pin driven into place and the fan securely fastened to the shaft.





Next step was to fit the little motor plaques onto the fan cover. It previously was fastened with pop rivets, but I made a decision I will use only dome head cap screws for fixing plaques. Looking good!





Inside the fan cover, a nylock nuts and washer at each end will hold this plaque in place.







With this plaque tightened down I went onto the smaller little plaque. What??!!? :vsad: There are no holes in the fan cover for this one!  Back into the thread I went ... You see what I see? It was simply slipped below the plaque I have just secured!





That is a no no on this lathe! :nono:

I will have to mark out new holes for this plaque and then mount it with its own little M3 cap screws. With the approximate location determined, I called it a night.





Hopefully we get some sleep tonight!

 :coffee:
Herman

~ To heal the soul is to embark on a new journey. ~

  mygoggie's perfecture
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Offline mygoggie

Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project
« Reply #249 on: October 15, 2020, 09:29:42 PM »
What a day ... men cannot multitask and I had to look after the Boss, the dogs, the ferrel cats and write a very complicated geotechnical report in layman's terms. Stressful to say the least!  :facepalm:

I sneaked in a few minutes for myself and mounted the little plate on the motor's fan cover.

First step was to stick some masking tape down to give me a working surface. I am not going to draw layout marks on a blingy new surface!





A few calculations later I could mark out the final resting place of the little plate.





Yeah, me likes.





Hole centres marked out and centre punched.







New holes drilled to 3,2mm diameter and deburred.







Aha, and there the little one is neatly secured. Looks good does it not?  No, it is actually parallel to the bigger plate. Camera depth angles creeping in ...






The technical data plaque will require M3,5 cap screws. Something I do not have stock of. I must see if I have any other stainless screws that will work. Something to do when I have time again.

Tomorrow is the case of the Pajero's transfer case. I need to open it up and replace the damaged bearings.

I sincerely hope Brian is going to be of assistance and guide me in that project!

 :coffee:

Herman

~ To heal the soul is to embark on a new journey. ~

  mygoggie's perfecture
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Offline mygoggie

Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project
« Reply #250 on: October 16, 2020, 04:30:08 PM »
Admin day, the wind is blowing and I need to get cracking on the Pajero.

Brain told me this morning: "Glue it in" ?? :roll:

I finally figured it out just now!  :moron:





The difference between the hole diameter and that of a M3 cap screw is minute. Simply glue the gap screws in with something that can release again in future. Hmmm, OK make that yesterday of today's far future.  :coffee:

Liquid pipe fitting sealant is an ideal "glue" that locks stuff in place and at a later stage allows you to unscrew the stuff again. I like the word "stuff". It is like "goeters". Can describe anything ...

Liquid pipe sealer smeared onto the cap screw.





All installed after five minutes.





I thought it best to clamp it down for a while to ensure the cap screws are securely in place. After all, who is in a hurry?





I really need to get cracking on spraying the sanded parts. The Rust Devil is flashing it's red eyes on the parts ....  :Ooooooh:

Now onto living under the Pajero and playing with nuts and bolts and bearings.

 :dop:
Herman

~ To heal the soul is to embark on a new journey. ~

  mygoggie's perfecture
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Offline d0dja

Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project
« Reply #251 on: October 16, 2020, 06:15:34 PM »
Stuff. Goeters. And in French "truc".

Offline mygoggie

Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project
« Reply #252 on: October 16, 2020, 09:23:12 PM »
Stuff. Goeters. And in French "truc".

And there I learn something again! Thanks @d0dja  :thumbs:
Herman

~ To heal the soul is to embark on a new journey. ~

  mygoggie's perfecture
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Offline mygoggie

Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project
« Reply #253 on: October 17, 2020, 10:57:49 AM »
Taking a break from under the Pajero. Very frustrating to open the transfer case as I am simply too big to fit in the space the tiny Thai mechanics make their videos from.

Motor looking very nice with all the plaques fixed.





I ran into an unexpected problem. First time I see rubber grow ... Any idea what I can use to make a new gasket seal?






Let me know!

 :coffee:
Herman

~ To heal the soul is to embark on a new journey. ~

  mygoggie's perfecture
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Offline bushtech37

Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project
« Reply #254 on: October 17, 2020, 11:15:31 AM »
I would just cut correct length out of the rubber strips and join with superglue again