Author Topic: Upright piano  (Read 293 times)

Offline Buggaree

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Upright piano
« on: February 12, 2019, 04:58:15 PM »
Hi folks. I'm taking a chance here. I'm looking for an upright piano for my son. I'm aware that many folks are emigrating and I'm hoping to get a loved upright piano.

I see many on gumtree, but I know squat about buying pianos so a trusted network like this is one of my avenues.

If you can help I would appreciate it.

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Offline fdlsys

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Re: Upright piano
« Reply #1 on: February 12, 2019, 10:13:11 PM »
Also, consider digital pianos. With headphones, he can practice at any time. Sound isolation works both ways. :giggle:
Brand new Kawai ES100 should be less than 10k. Yamaha and Roland in the same price range are not as good.

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Offline Trompie67

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Re: Upright piano
« Reply #2 on: February 13, 2019, 02:42:01 AM »
Hi folks. I'm taking a chance here. I'm looking for an upright piano for my son. I'm aware that many folks are emigrating and I'm hoping to get a loved upright piano.

I see many on gumtree, but I know squat about buying pianos so a trusted network like this is one of my avenues.

If you can help I would appreciate it.

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You can also rent a piano rather than purchase one.
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Offline Agaton Sax

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Re: Upright piano
« Reply #3 on: February 13, 2019, 07:00:38 AM »
https://lonaspianos.co.za/pianos.html

They restore pianos,so won't sell you a dud-unlike the smalls, wide range.Guarenteed buy back,wide range available,they come and tune the thing once a year. Countrywide delivery and service.

Jeez, I sound like a poorly written advertisement. Highly recommended. No affiliation or connection,just a happy customer for a long time.




Offline Hazazel

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Re: Upright piano
« Reply #4 on: February 13, 2019, 07:44:17 AM »
Gumtree and OLX should be your best bet, and the upright piano's goes for next to nothing but factor in tuning/service as well as they tend to end up out of tune once transported. I have even seen folks give away upright piano's from time to time. I would suggest taking someone with who knows upright piano's so that you don't end up with a dud.

Offline adie

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Re: Upright piano
« Reply #5 on: February 14, 2019, 04:03:16 PM »
Just gave one away. But then I'm in Durban.

Offline msch997

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Re: Upright piano
« Reply #6 on: February 15, 2019, 02:04:59 PM »
Hi folks. I'm taking a chance here. I'm looking for an upright piano for my son. I'm aware that many folks are emigrating and I'm hoping to get a loved upright piano.

I see many on gumtree, but I know squat about buying pianos so a trusted network like this is one of my avenues.

If you can help I would appreciate it.
 

Hi, I have no idea re your budget etc.  My wife is piano player and she has a Yamaha Clavinova CLP 950 that she would let go.  Yes its not an entry level model and its electronic.  She inherited her mothers 60 year old Yamaha Upright and so tends to play that the most, hence the reason the CLP 950 is available.  She is a home player so the CLP has never left the building since purchase from new.

Send em a message if this interests you.  Apologies if it is not what you are looking for.




Offline Buggaree

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Re: Upright piano
« Reply #7 on: February 15, 2019, 02:30:33 PM »
Also, consider digital pianos. With headphones, he can practice at any time. Sound isolation works both ways. :giggle:
Brand new Kawai ES100 should be less than 10k. Yamaha and Roland in the same price range are not as good.

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His teacher doesnt like the key weights of the digital, as you dont feel the tension. Those Yamahas at Marshalls are lookers indeed

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Offline Buggaree

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Re: Upright piano
« Reply #8 on: February 15, 2019, 02:30:58 PM »
You can also rent a piano rather than purchase one.
Good idea. I'll check it out

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Offline Buggaree

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Re: Upright piano
« Reply #9 on: February 15, 2019, 02:31:27 PM »
https://lonaspianos.co.za/pianos.html

They restore pianos,so won't sell you a dud-unlike the smalls, wide range.Guarenteed buy back,wide range available,they come and tune the thing once a year. Countrywide delivery and service.

Jeez, I sound like a poorly written advertisement. Highly recommended. No affiliation or connection,just a happy customer for a long time.
Thanks. I'll check them out

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Offline Buggaree

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Re: Upright piano
« Reply #10 on: February 15, 2019, 02:32:39 PM »
Gumtree and OLX should be your best bet, and the upright piano's goes for next to nothing but factor in tuning/service as well as they tend to end up out of tune once transported. I have even seen folks give away upright piano's from time to time. I would suggest taking someone with who knows upright piano's so that you don't end up with a dud.
I'll have to take his teacher along. I havent the fainted clue here... hehehe

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Offline PAPPA3

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Re: Upright piano
« Reply #11 on: February 15, 2019, 05:04:05 PM »
We have one.  Our church's one.  No longer been used for about 10 months now.  Good condition.  we're in Greenhills, Randfontein, West rand

Offline fuz940510

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Re: Upright piano
« Reply #12 on: February 15, 2019, 05:29:08 PM »
Digital is an option - but i'm an analog snob when it comes to pianos. The sound of digital will get close, but the feel is incomparable.

I've been playing piano for a while, but only really checked out the inside of my own piano. The best would be if you can open it up and check out the insides. If you can't, play each key and check for the following:

1. Sound ends as soon as you remove pressure from the key. If it continues for a little bit afterwards, this could mean replacement damper pads or mechanism repair.

2. Listen for a "zing" when playing the key. This is a sign that the damper on a different key is starting to go, again meaning damper pads or mechanism repair.

3. Key is quieter than others. This is an issue with 1 key on my piano, but i can't figure out the cause yet.

Note that there will be a point higher up in the register where the damping doesn't work - the strings get too short to fit a damper, and the note has a lot of sustain.

Even better is if you can open the piano up, most importantly the panel above the keys which hides the mechanism. If you can, check for:

1. Hammer pads are not rotten, and are firmly attached. Some grooving in the contact point from the strings is ok, but can become a problem.

2. Damper pads not rotten, and firmly attached. Some grooving in the contact is good, as that provides better damping.

3. If there are any leather parts, see that there isn't any splitting and that the leather is still supple. Be gentle, as the leather is quite thin.

4. Check out the pedals. Pressing the right hand pedal will move the dampers away from the strings, allowing for sustained notes. The left hand pedal should move the hammers closer to the strings. Some pianos have 3 pedals, but i'm not familiar with what the 3rd pedal does.

5. Check out the back of the piano. Some of them have a fabric back, some have a solid back. If there is a fabric back, the fabric should be pretty taught without signs of perishing.

6. Check panel gap on any moving parts. Good pianos have pretty close panel gaps. Any change in size of the gap is a sign that the wood is warped, and can affect how it sounds and how long it will last.

To get an idea of the pieces i'm talking about: http://thetunersblog.blogspot.com/2014/10/upright-piano-action-diagrams.html

Tuning isn't a massive expense in the world of piano maintenance, and should be done relatively regularly. Also, see if you can place it out of direct sunlight, drafts and against an interior wall. Pianos like having a good amount of climate control, and this will mean less tuning and better longevity.

Hope that helps, and happy hunting!
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Offline Shonver

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Re: Upright piano
« Reply #13 on: February 17, 2019, 06:59:20 AM »
His teacher doesnt like the key weights of the digital, as you dont feel the tension. Those Yamahas at Marshalls are lookers indeed

"The digital" is perhaps a generalisation. Good digital pianos have weighted keys and touch sensitivity. The very good ones have actual piano mechanisms inside to bring you closest to the original; it depends on your budget. Don't mistake "electric piano" or "keyboard" for "digital piano". Here's the opinion of a music teacher on the subject:

What Piano Should I Buy as a Beginner? For Beginners & Children
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DON'T PANIC
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Offline Buggaree

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Re: Upright piano
« Reply #14 on: February 17, 2019, 09:07:50 PM »
Digital is an option - but i'm an analog snob when it comes to pianos. The sound of digital will get close, but the feel is incomparable.

I've been playing piano for a while, but only really checked out the inside of my own piano. The best would be if you can open it up and check out the insides. If you can't, play each key and check for the following:

1. Sound ends as soon as you remove pressure from the key. If it continues for a little bit afterwards, this could mean replacement damper pads or mechanism repair.

2. Listen for a "zing" when playing the key. This is a sign that the damper on a different key is starting to go, again meaning damper pads or mechanism repair.

3. Key is quieter than others. This is an issue with 1 key on my piano, but i can't figure out the cause yet.

Note that there will be a point higher up in the register where the damping doesn't work - the strings get too short to fit a damper, and the note has a lot of sustain.

Even better is if you can open the piano up, most importantly the panel above the keys which hides the mechanism. If you can, check for:

1. Hammer pads are not rotten, and are firmly attached. Some grooving in the contact point from the strings is ok, but can become a problem.

2. Damper pads not rotten, and firmly attached. Some grooving in the contact is good, as that provides better damping.

3. If there are any leather parts, see that there isn't any splitting and that the leather is still supple. Be gentle, as the leather is quite thin.

4. Check out the pedals. Pressing the right hand pedal will move the dampers away from the strings, allowing for sustained notes. The left hand pedal should move the hammers closer to the strings. Some pianos have 3 pedals, but i'm not familiar with what the 3rd pedal does.

5. Check out the back of the piano. Some of them have a fabric back, some have a solid back. If there is a fabric back, the fabric should be pretty taught without signs of perishing.

6. Check panel gap on any moving parts. Good pianos have pretty close panel gaps. Any change in size of the gap is a sign that the wood is warped, and can affect how it sounds and how long it will last.

To get an idea of the pieces i'm talking about: http://thetunersblog.blogspot.com/2014/10/upright-piano-action-diagrams.html

Tuning isn't a massive expense in the world of piano maintenance, and should be done relatively regularly. Also, see if you can place it out of direct sunlight, drafts and against an interior wall. Pianos like having a good amount of climate control, and this will mean less tuning and better longevity.

Hope that helps, and happy hunting!
This is gold. Thank you

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