Author Topic: Different Types Of Rooms, Whatís Your Favourite  (Read 376 times)

Online stereosane

Different Types Of Rooms, Whatís Your Favourite
« on: October 12, 2018, 09:47:48 AM »
Having just moved last weekend I thought Iíd see if theres any preference for a certain type of room eg ( Wood, facebrick, plastered wall.. )

Living in a full wood house roof, wall & floor I was stressing about my new houses lounge which is a mix of materials...wood roof, tiled floors, FaceBrick wall behind seat and speakers and plastered wall on both sides of the speakers, I was expecting the room to sound much brighter and echoey, but the exact opposite has happened.. I have a lot less ringing in my new room and the high frequencies are even smoother than before and Im getting much more deep bass now. I always thought brick and tile would be the worst for a system but Iím pleasantly surprised. This is with no treatment, just the usual thick curtains, rug and couches..

So what type of room do you like for your sound?

Offline Nirvana

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Re: Different Types Of Rooms, Whatís Your Favourite
« Reply #1 on: October 12, 2018, 10:04:24 AM »
Possibly the facebrick helps with diffusion..?
And I think bass might be a function of room dimensions...  :nfi:
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Offline Nirvana

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Re: Different Types Of Rooms, Whatís Your Favourite
« Reply #2 on: October 12, 2018, 10:07:38 AM »
Also,different materials should have varying acoustic properties,which should help with the end result..?
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Offline LouisF

Re: Different Types Of Rooms, Whatís Your Favourite
« Reply #3 on: October 12, 2018, 10:14:42 AM »
The differences in volume and distances between walls and between ceiling and floor all influence especially the deer bass frequencies. The general rule is the bigger the room the lower the frequencies you will hear. Distances between parallel surfaces determine if you will have standing waves, for instance, and at what frequencies.
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Online stereosane

Re: Different Types Of Rooms, Whatís Your Favourite
« Reply #4 on: October 12, 2018, 10:50:50 AM »
The room is meduim sized but not one Wall is parallel to another, they are all angled one is angled slightly inwards the other outwards, sonim sure that might be helping a bit.

Offline Tzs503gp

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Re: Different Types Of Rooms, Whatís Your Favourite
« Reply #5 on: October 12, 2018, 11:40:42 AM »
The only complaint I have with my room, is that my couch is against a smooth painted wall. I get better sound when I interlock my fingers behind my head, in the typical ďrelaxingĒ pose. My arms block the reflection from the back wall to my ears. It really makes quite a difference.

Iíve been threatening to get to making a diffuser. I should lay off that relaxing pose a little.
« Last Edit: October 12, 2018, 11:43:00 AM by Tzs503gp »

Online Michon

Re: Different Types Of Rooms, What’s Your Favourite
« Reply #6 on: October 12, 2018, 11:56:56 AM »
The only complaint I have with my room, is that my couch is against a smooth painted wall. I get better sound when I interlock my fingers behind my head, in the typical “relaxing” pose. My arms block the reflection from the back wall to my ears. It really makes quite a difference.

I’ve been threatening to get to making a diffuser. I should lay off that relaxing pose a little.

A diffuser in that location is not recommended. They have an effective working distance. When you're too close to them you can actually hear them diffusing frequencies unevenly. In that small distance the sound (frequency dependant) will not have diffused effectively so you may even end up with more egregious comb filtering in certain bands. A more typical recommendation is to rather put broadband absorption there (due to the proximity of the direct vs reflected signal to one another it makes more sense to absorb the reflected signal instead of attempting to "fix it", i.e. reducing comb filtering, via diffusion).
« Last Edit: October 12, 2018, 12:02:50 PM by Michon »
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Offline Tzs503gp

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Re: Different Types Of Rooms, Whatís Your Favourite
« Reply #7 on: October 12, 2018, 12:18:36 PM »
Thanks Michon!

Saved me a lot of work! Now instead of me cutting 100ís of angled blocks and glueing and painting it all up, I can resume the relaxed pose, and have the wife cut foam and sow up an absorptive piece.

 :2thumbs:

Online Michon

Re: Different Types Of Rooms, Whatís Your Favourite
« Reply #8 on: October 12, 2018, 12:27:12 PM »
Thanks Michon!

Saved me a lot of work! Now instead of me cutting 100ís of angled blocks and glueing and painting it all up, I can resume the relaxed pose, and have the wife cut foam and sow up an absorptive piece.

 :2thumbs:

You're welcome.

Depending on the size of your room there could be benefits to diffusion in other locations though.

Note which foam you plan on using and what the desired outcome of the treatment is. Different materials have different absorption coefficients at different frequencies. Rigid fiberglass with a density between 45 kg/m^3 and 90 kg/m^3 is the industry standard depending on the exact goal. Generally "acoustic foam" products have a lower absorption coefficient than fiberglass, especially below 500 Hz.
Tidal HiFi > MOTU 828x > Speaker build pending.
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Offline LouisF

Re: Different Types Of Rooms, Whatís Your Favourite
« Reply #9 on: October 12, 2018, 12:36:15 PM »
The room is meduim sized but not one Wall is parallel to another, they are all angled one is angled slightly inwards the other outwards, sonim sure that might be helping a bit.
Then standing waves will not be a problem and I think the angled walls do have a beneficial effect - that would be a certainty if I were to design me a listening room. There is still the height of the room that does play a part as well. I once read a comment elsewhere on the forum that standing waves in sound do not need parallel surfaces to develop, but that is not quite true. It is an interesting subject to google, for instance: "How does standing waves develop?" or some such question.
"No matter how educated, talented, rich or cool you believe you are,
how you treat people ultimately tells all."
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I have learned more from people who have differed from me than from those who have agreed with me.

Offline Tzs503gp

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Re: Different Types Of Rooms, Whatís Your Favourite
« Reply #10 on: October 12, 2018, 12:39:11 PM »
You're welcome.

Depending on the size of your room there could be benefits to diffusion in other locations though.

Note which foam you plan on using and what the desired outcome of the treatment is. Different materials have different absorption coefficients at different frequencies. Rigid fiberglass with a density between 45 kg/m^3 and 90 kg/m^3 is the industry standard depending on the exact goal. Generally "acoustic foam" products have a lower absorption coefficient than fiberglass, especially below 500 Hz.

Before I go that route, Iím gonna come and visit you. Iíll need details.

Online stereosane

Re: Different Types Of Rooms, Whatís Your Favourite
« Reply #11 on: October 16, 2018, 06:36:52 AM »
So after finally getting settled I sat down for my first proper uninterrupted listen with some familiar tracks just to make sure my setup is right... but I picked up a problem that my vocals and staging are pulling to the left, way more than it should so I downloaded a mono recording and that confirmed that my soundstage was actually very biased towards the left.

So I spent two solid days moving each speaker all over but I just couldnít get it right  :facepalm: so I started googling and everyone suggested using the balance control which I didnít really want to do as I understand a balance control fades the one channel out which Iím sure would affect the softer sounds and micro detail from that speaker, so I googled to see if my amp has a balance function, I was surprised to find my amps balance control is actually a gain control for each speaker, so I was able to increase the gain on the right speakerin 1db increments. It took 3db or gain to get my vocals dead centre on the mono recording, Iím so impressed with this feature and I can finally just sit and relax again  :dance:

Offline chrisc

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Re: Different Types Of Rooms, Whatís Your Favourite
« Reply #12 on: October 16, 2018, 08:22:16 AM »
A dealer I know spent ages adjusting speaker distance (distance from wall, distance from listening position, distance apart), toe-in, curtains open or closed.   There are now stickers on the floor so it can be reproduced

He referred me to a formula, based on the Cardas Golden Rule.   You can read all about it here:   http://forums.stevehoffman.tv/threads/my-favorite-speaker-placement-formula.65864/
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Offline Rotten Johnny

Re: Different Types Of Rooms, Whatís Your Favourite
« Reply #13 on: October 16, 2018, 08:45:18 AM »
Get, read and apply Get Better Sound, especially the parts that pertain to speaker placement and listening position in any given room.
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