Author Topic: Supersonic One-Eleven  (Read 979 times)

Offline Steerpike

Re: Supersonic One-Eleven
« Reply #15 on: May 27, 2018, 12:47:34 AM »
and the other across the DC out. Not entirely sure what it's for since it's in parallel with the whopping 5000µF reservoir cap.

Physically large capacitors perversely have a high impedance at high frequencies - this due to their inductance, which is conveniently ignored in basic circuit theory. This means that at high audio frequencies the power supply appears as a fairly high impedance, not the low impedance that one wants. The small capacitor keeps the power supply impedance low at all audio frequencies.

Offline El Sid

Re: Supersonic One-Eleven
« Reply #16 on: May 27, 2018, 11:27:11 AM »
Thanks Steerpike! I’m learning a lot on this forum that I never learnt in “basic circuit theory”!

Offline El Sid

Re: Supersonic One-Eleven
« Reply #17 on: May 27, 2018, 05:02:13 PM »
Ok so we had a family lunch today, so I asked what had happened to the TT and speakers. Lots of “I thought you had it” and “doesn’t so-and-so have it” until my youngest brother remembered they had been stolen in a robbery. So no chance of the complete set.

Offline Steerpike

Re: Supersonic One-Eleven
« Reply #18 on: May 28, 2018, 01:20:07 AM »
The AP75 wasn't that great, so other than nostalgia, it is not great loss. It had the horrible stationary spindle with a ball race, no real bearing as with the 301 & 401. Rumble would be very evident.

Offline Marc Hugo

Re: Supersonic One-Eleven
« Reply #19 on: September 10, 2018, 08:07:43 PM »
What an absolute delight finding one of these, the rather worthy Supersonic One-Eleven stereo "systems"  They were in fact made in-to in Bulawayo.  This model was the predecessor to the "made under licence" by Supersonic "Pioneer Blue Orchid" - which was quite similar in looks, had very similar high efficiency speakers and as with all thse Rhodesian hi-fis, were more than respectable for the time and "could go really loud"!!  This model slightly predated the Supersonic 133 which had styling inspired by B+O and the Supersonic 166.  They typically used Garrard SP-25 T/Ts.  Also from Bulawayo was the Tempest range of hi-fis.   Both brands had a decent range of portable radios, combination radio/cassette recorders and even portable record players shaped like large attache cases.  Despite the big Tempest Super Sixty (padded speaker tops so you could sit on them..) and Super Eighty and Supersonic 166, neither was a match for the WRS SA60 system from Salisbury which was launched in 1972 with Lenco B52 (L-70), and later B55 (L72) and L75 and even if wanted L-85 TTs. This was the first Rhodesian hi-fi with every component as a separate entity - amp, tuner etc with a range of cabinet options.  A further option was a National Panasonic cassette deck - top loading and quite reliable.

Offline El Sid

Re: Supersonic One-Eleven
« Reply #20 on: September 13, 2018, 11:11:53 AM »
Interesting background Marc - do you still have any of these systems?