Author Topic: 8K TV around the corner?  (Read 2860 times)

Online 2wice

  • Trade Count: (+4)
  • AVForums Veteran
  • *****
  • Posts: 2,352
Re: 8K TV around the corner?
« Reply #30 on: February 13, 2018, 08:02:18 PM »
Around someone else's corner is the only way I'll ever see this.

Offline matthieup

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • AVForums Member
  • **
  • Posts: 52
Re: 8K TV around the corner?
« Reply #31 on: February 16, 2018, 10:52:29 AM »
I agree the issue with UHD might be the calibration, but when you spend that kind of many it should be setup good to go.
It's like if you go buy a car and the steering is loose and wheels not aligned... shouldn't happen

Offline KenMasters

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • AVForums Veteran
  • *****
  • Posts: 4,723
Re: 8K TV around the corner?
« Reply #32 on: February 16, 2018, 11:38:53 AM »
I agree the issue with UHD might be the calibration, but when you spend that kind of many it should be setup good to go.
It's like if you go buy a car and the steering is loose and wheels not aligned... shouldn't happen

In recent years TVs have been very good in their accurate modes (Cinema / Movie / Expert / Pro). That's not how they're set in store through, there they're in their Dynamic / Vivid shop mode, which switches on the full suite of picture "enhancements" in order to attract the eye and differentiate their TVs from their competitors.

Offline Simango4

  • Trade Count: (+14)
  • AVForums Veteran
  • ***
  • Posts: 208
Re: 8K TV around the corner?
« Reply #33 on: April 17, 2018, 09:38:00 AM »
Good news for us late adopters from a price drop of old tech point of view...I'm still in the 1080p age and only planning to go 4k HDR OLED once LG's TV prices, nVidia GTX1080 prices and 4k HDR projectors become reasonable for my pocket.

I don't get the hype with high resolutions such as 8k given that a lot of people who bought 4k TVs don't even use the 4k capabilities enough to justify the expense.

People with high end gaming PCs and fiber-optic based internet connections can justify the 4k TVs purchase, but I'm not sure about 8k though.

However, those with current consoles like Xbox, PS & Nintendo etc. and DSTV decoders just can't fairly justify the purchase. As much as current consoles advertise 4k capability, they barely play in 4k (most of the gaming titles are locked to 1080p or even 900p / 720p or variants below 1080p in order to maintain playable frame rates, only a handful play at 4k resolution.
Music is What Feelings Sound Like...
You Don't Stop Gaming Because you Grow Old, You Grow Old Because you Stop Gaming...

Offline Morne Coetzee

  • Trade Count: (+12)
  • AVForums Veteran
  • ***
  • Posts: 672
  • POWER | PRECISION | PURITY
Re: 8K TV around the corner?
« Reply #34 on: May 11, 2018, 09:55:11 PM »
@KenMasters first I am crazy about your passion for the "video" side of AV so thanks for that 👍 Can you maybe (and I think you had before) explain the terms of UHD (as on Netflix) UHD Discs and Native 4K content? The reason I asked is that I have noticed a significant dirrerence in picture quality between what is considered a downloaded/ torrent/ripped UHD/4K content and so called Native 4K content. Most noticably the file size of the streams or download is 4GB vs Native 4K for the same movie is 50GB. Samsung once sold a HDD with around 6 or so movies Native 4K for around R4000!!! I happened to get hold of one of those drives when they went on sale and I have never seen anything like that available since.
There is Always justification for more Amplification!

Offline naughty

  • Trade Count: (+23)
  • AVForums Veteran
  • *****
  • Posts: 6,504
Re: 8K TV around the corner?
« Reply #35 on: May 12, 2018, 12:20:26 AM »
I agree the issue with UHD might be the calibration, but when you spend that kind of many it should be setup good to go.
It's like if you go buy a car and the steering is loose and wheels not aligned... shouldn't happen

nope - you are absolutely incorrect - because rooms and lighting conditions differ - so you want to calibrate on your own starting from the base settings (ie the "accurate mode" settings that Kenmasters describes above)

its more like going to buy a car and you have to correct the seat adjustments because not everyone is the same shortness or tallness and fatness .... and also adjusting rear view mirror angles etc .... and nowadays your normal TV has that higher resolution as standard and you are not spending any extra money over and above what your regular 1080p full HD sets were selling for a year or two ago, so it cannot be described as "that kind of money" because it isnt any extra - in fact some sizes of UHD TV are cheaper than what their full HD counterparts of equivalent size were a year or two ago

Offline KenMasters

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • AVForums Veteran
  • *****
  • Posts: 4,723
Re: 8K TV around the corner?
« Reply #36 on: May 12, 2018, 06:59:00 AM »
@KenMasters first I am crazy about your passion for the "video" side of AV so thanks for that 👍 Can you maybe (and I think you had before) explain the terms of UHD (as on Netflix) UHD Discs and Native 4K content?

Thanks! Unfortunately the introduction of Ultra HD was messy, leading to a lot of confusion, but it's actually very simple. "Ultra HD" is the TV standard that replaces "HDTV", it offers two new resolutions, 4K and 8K, new frame rates of 100/120fps, a much wider colour gamut (which currently we can only take advantage of a small portion of), 10 & 12 bit colour depths and a new EOTF (what we refer to as gamma) which requires much higher peak brightness (10 000 nits is the target).

The resolution is the obvious part, the elements outside of that and the new refresh rates have fallen under the blanket term "HDR". 4K and HDR are not separate entities, they exists as part of the single Ultra HD format - if it is Ultra HD it is HDR.

The reason for the confusion was that manufacturers were eager to get the ball rolling on the new standard to stimulate sales. So without the actual standard having been established yet, they pushed HDTVs with 4K resolutions as "UHD" TVs. The first Ultra HDTVs were introduced in 2016, but by then "UHD" had irreparably muddied the water with most people's understanding of the new standard being about 4K rather than the more thorough overhaul it actually is (not helped by all the 4K Rec. 709 [HDTV] content floating about) - to the point that Ultra HD BDs are still labled "4K Ultra HD" where really the 4K should not be required (and technically incorrect as most Ultra HD content is not 4K).

So maybe I went and made a simple thing sound more complicated than it is, but it's really as simple as we had the HDTV standard (Rec. 709) and now we have Ultra HD (Rec. 2020). UHD and Native 4k have no place in the nomenclature. The extra resolution is there so that we should no longer have to worry about resolution and the other elements are there in order to render images as the human eye perceives the world, as opposed to the limitations of CRT rendering, which is what all previous standards were based on.

« Last Edit: May 12, 2018, 07:09:54 AM by KenMasters »

Offline matthieup

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • AVForums Member
  • **
  • Posts: 52
Re: 8K TV around the corner?
« Reply #37 on: May 12, 2018, 07:16:45 AM »
nope - you are absolutely incorrect - because rooms and lighting conditions differ - so you want to calibrate on your own starting from the base settings (ie the "accurate mode" settings that Kenmasters describes above)

its more like going to buy a car and you have to correct the seat adjustments because not everyone is the same shortness or tallness and fatness .... and also adjusting rear view mirror angles etc .... and nowadays your normal TV has that higher resolution as standard and you are not spending any extra money over and above what your regular 1080p full HD sets were selling for a year or two ago, so it cannot be described as "that kind of money" because it isnt any extra - in fact some sizes of UHD TV are cheaper than what their full HD counterparts of equivalent size were a year or two ago
Good point

Sent from my SM-G965F using Tapatalk