Author Topic: Sound Proofing a Door  (Read 4156 times)

Offline TimbaLand

Re: Sound Proofing a Door
« Reply #30 on: October 16, 2017, 11:36:10 AM »
Cheapest or most cost effective option  :nfi:



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Offline vleisman

Re: Sound Proofing a Door
« Reply #31 on: October 16, 2017, 12:12:01 PM »
Best solution offered

Removal can be painful   :thinking:

you would probably get the added benefit of no more moustache  :sh1tstirrer:

I think it's best I avoid this thread...

Offline B_Unit

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Re: Sound Proofing a Door
« Reply #32 on: October 17, 2017, 10:29:49 PM »


Gentlemen, one at a time.

Cheapest or most cost effective option  :nfi:



It depends hey, not everyone is into that  :roll:

you would probably get the added benefit of no more moustache  :sh1tstirrer:


Im not aiming for ones with moustaches here  :whistler:


The most important bit is getting it air-tight. The bulk of the 'partition' that you use can be something like chip-board, or even another door if you can find a cheap secondhand one. A double layer partition is way better than a single.  Then you need to seal all around it in a totally air-tight manner - mattress foam isn't the best. Pool Noodles are probably good, being closed cell.


I can always rely on Steerpike for good advice !

So I have two plans of actions here.

  • Try put a seal on the door with some of this.

    I feel it will not do much good since there is a gap at the bottom of the door.

  • Next will be to get one large piece of wood. (which kind I do not know) and then get pool noodles cut them and then silde them on the corners of the wooden piece and slide that into the door space.
    The pool noodles are a perfect Idea but I do not know how flexible they will be around the corners.

Should there be an air gap between the new door and the wooden piece I will install ? Or should some materiel be placed in this space ?

Thanks for the feedback guys. Pics will be posted as soon as some progress is made.
« Last Edit: October 17, 2017, 10:33:14 PM by B_Unit »

Offline AlleyCat

Re: Sound Proofing a Door
« Reply #33 on: October 17, 2017, 10:56:29 PM »
^^Byron, please post some pics, especially when there's these noises you talk of, preferably when both rooms are occupied. We won't be able to constructively assist without pics/video(s).

Seeing/hearing is believing.
"Not everything meaningful is measurable, and not everything measurable is meaningful" - Floyd Toole

Offline Timber_MG

Re: Sound Proofing a Door
« Reply #34 on: October 17, 2017, 10:59:15 PM »
Assuming the plan is to seal off the door, I would look into drywall track & stud and affix it in a manner to be approved by landlord. If you are absolutely forbidden from montage adhesives and screw fasteners, you can build a frame (timber or light steel frame), fill the cavity with a suitable absorber and don't link the two wall layers (meaning don't have studs affix both inner and outer barriers. The whole frame would then be gasketed and press fit into position on two foam seals. If you are looking to do this on the cheap, even without the infill it can work well and the attenuation is largely dependent on the seal and the air gap thickness. I would start with a 63mm or greater floor track for the outer frame and use 51mm studs staggered as to not couple inner and outer "wall".

For a temporary and cheap relief you can focus on sealing any gaps with sealing tape and close off the door gaps. The more isolation you achieve, the more important the sealing becomes.
« Last Edit: October 17, 2017, 11:02:04 PM by Timber_MG »

Offline HBAutomation

Re: Sound Proofing a Door
« Reply #35 on: October 17, 2017, 11:25:07 PM »
Pool noodles?   :BWAHAHAH: keep it coming...
When You Come to a Fork in the Road, Take It!            [Yogi Berra]

Offline Scubadude

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Re: Sound Proofing a Door
« Reply #36 on: October 18, 2017, 05:42:26 AM »
Quote
Next will be to get one large piece of wood

With the right companion getting large wood would be easy enough.

 
Quote
... get pool noodles ... and ... silde them on ... the wooden piece

You may be doing this wrong. I suggest sliding the "pool noodle" onto a broomstick and get on the job with the wooden piece in its natural state.
"We should no more let numbers define audio quality than we should let chemical analysis be the arbiter of fine wines."  Nelson Pass

Offline B_Unit

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Re: Sound Proofing a Door
« Reply #37 on: October 19, 2017, 11:20:25 PM »
With the right companion getting large wood would be easy enough.

 
You may be doing this wrong. I suggest sliding the "pool noodle" onto a broomstick and get on the job with the wooden piece in its natural state.

Could you please explain "get on the job with the wooden piece in its natural state" ? I cannot tell if its an innuendo.

Here is a super rough drawing of my plan.



Note in the drawing the noodles are only on two sides but the plan is to surround the wood with them.

Ill cut the "noodle" allowing a space of the wood to slide into. Almost like how one installs a windshield for a car by fitting a rubber around the windshield so it will fit snug on the car frame.

So I went to Bauhaus a much better version of Builder Warehouse this side of the world to investigate what materials they have.

I found some chip board wood. What do you guys think about using this ?



I also found some insulation material.

Some REALLY thick pieces of polystyrene (maybe this could be a substitute for the wood ? I could just glue/cut them to the size I need.





and some fluffy material (don't quite know the name).




Offline d0dja

Re: Sound Proofing a Door
« Reply #38 on: October 20, 2017, 10:48:51 AM »
That Isover would do the trick well. Looks like same as Isotherm. It's much better than foam because it's denser, much much better at absorbing lower frequencies.

Pool noodle looks like a mission for little reward. Cut the chipboard so that it is as tight as possible with minimal gap, and then duct tape the crack. Will hold the board in place, so double the benefit.

Two layers of chipboard with isotherm inside, cracks/air gaps taped up tight. Job done.

 


Offline B_Unit

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Re: Sound Proofing a Door
« Reply #39 on: October 20, 2017, 04:10:10 PM »
That Isover would do the trick well. Looks like same as Isotherm. It's much better than foam because it's denser, much much better at absorbing lower frequencies.

Pool noodle looks like a mission for little reward. Cut the chipboard so that it is as tight as possible with minimal gap, and then duct tape the crack. Will hold the board in place, so double the benefit.

Two layers of chipboard with isotherm inside, cracks/air gaps taped up tight. Job done.

I cannot stick anything to the wall. duct tape will remove the paint eventually.

Offline B_Unit

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Re: Sound Proofing a Door
« Reply #40 on: October 20, 2017, 04:57:48 PM »


I did just notice this on the Isover cover it s also pretty cheap...

I just read that polystyrene is not a good option for sound proofing.

Any other suggestions on how to seal the wood within the door frame ?



« Last Edit: October 20, 2017, 05:10:14 PM by B_Unit »

Offline B_Unit

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Re: Sound Proofing a Door
« Reply #41 on: October 20, 2017, 06:44:28 PM »
Here Is some update drawings done in Google Sketch Up




Offline Timber_MG

Re: Sound Proofing a Door
« Reply #42 on: October 20, 2017, 08:42:37 PM »
Use an adhesive strip gasket from Gelmar to seal the panels. I would still opt for drywall materials as one can simply implement staggered studs and get the attenuation in a panel that easily fits inside the door frame. Your suggested config could be massively improved by making the door air-tight, as is you may not get enough attenuation for the effort. Even a draft stopper and some sealant tape would make a dramatic difference.

Offline marantz123

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Re: Sound Proofing a Door
« Reply #43 on: October 21, 2017, 11:40:23 AM »
Awesome thread!   :clap:  owners of rental units dont want any structures fixed that would leave holes in walls and tiles afterwards. The cheapest, easiest, quickest, owner-acceptable and multipurpose solution I can think of  is to get a foam shop to cut a 6inch thick piece of matress foam that is 2 inches extra all the way round wrt length x breadth of the doorway and then stuff this in that door way. Multipurpose function comes in when you have buddies over and need an extra matress...if theres nothing else going on....either side of the door. :giggle: If not good enough, get another 6'inches. Nothing will come through there! Additionally a little hifi with a Crossley turntable playing softly in the background will drown out any remnants of a soprano singer from the other room.  Increase volume if neccessary/possibe. Kent Kassler will tell us which LP you should play!...waiting in anticipation!! :rubhands:

Offline Timber_MG

Re: Sound Proofing a Door
« Reply #44 on: October 22, 2017, 07:04:34 AM »
Nothing will come through there!

Unfortunately this couldn't be further from the truth. You need mass, stiffness, decoupling of membranes and gap sealing to effectively attenuate a noise source from an adjacent room.