Author Topic: Harmon's "How to listen" software available in free Beta  (Read 1355 times)

Offline kinosfronimos

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Harmon's "How to listen" software available in free Beta
« on: February 11, 2014, 11:05:34 PM »
Don't know if this has been posted before
http://harmanhowtolisten.blogspot.com/2011/01/welcome-to-how-to-listen.html

'How to Listen' is a desktop software application developed by the Harman International R&D group for the purpose of training and selecting listeners used in audio product research, development, and testing. The software consists of a number of training exercises where different kinds of timbral, spatial and dynamic distortions commonly found within the recording and audio chains are simulated and added to music.
The listenerís task is to identify, classify or rate these distortions according to a number of well-defined perceptual attributes and scales. The software automatically adjusts the difficulty of each training task based on the listenerís performance.

Let's see if my ears can learn anything  :moron:
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Offline kinosfronimos

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Re: Harmon's "How to listen" software available in free Beta
« Reply #1 on: February 12, 2014, 01:10:24 PM »
Anyone played around with the software?  :whip:
Monitor Audio Speakers: BR6's, BX-FX's, RX-C; Cambridge Audio: Asure 540R V3 & 540D V2; Samsung LED: 46EH5300; Xonar U3 DAC; Bose SoundTrue Headphones Around-Ear & Beyerdynamic DT770 Cans

Offline Capetowntracks

Re: Harmon's "How to listen" software available in free Beta
« Reply #2 on: February 12, 2014, 04:34:46 PM »
Just finished a brief session. Firstly, it's a bit of a b*tch to install on a Mac. (It helps to read the manual, I discovered.)

It's not exactly intuitive, but once you get going... addictive.

Basically, you listen to 4 basic music selections (pop-jazz, blues, rock, vocal, if one must pigeonhole) and the idea is to compare Flat and EQd versions to see what EQ has been applied. There's an opportunity to practise as well. As you move up the levels, the applied effects become more subtle and harder to distinguish.

I got to Level 10/Skill Level 5 on the first track before I lost my 100 % record. At that level there were 4 or 5 curves to choose from. Sound engineers might have a head start here. At any rate, it looks an interesting learning tool.
« Last Edit: February 12, 2014, 04:37:07 PM by Capetowntracks »

Offline chrisc

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Re: Harmon's "How to listen" software available in free Beta
« Reply #3 on: February 12, 2014, 04:58:02 PM »
Another Hi-Fi Club project.  Busy downloading the manual and program right now.  Can see some differing opinions when this is tried on a large audience
Music is the shorthand of emotion

Offline kinosfronimos

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Re: Harmon's "How to listen" software available in free Beta
« Reply #4 on: February 13, 2014, 12:25:15 PM »
This Hi-Fi club of which you speak, Ctp I'm guessing...?

Installation easy as pie on Windows.
There are a bunch of other tests too like distinguishing hiss etc
I can't say say I got that far with a clean record, I found the selection between 4 EQ curves tough  :facepalm:
Monitor Audio Speakers: BR6's, BX-FX's, RX-C; Cambridge Audio: Asure 540R V3 & 540D V2; Samsung LED: 46EH5300; Xonar U3 DAC; Bose SoundTrue Headphones Around-Ear & Beyerdynamic DT770 Cans

Offline Capetowntracks

Re: Harmon's "How to listen" software available in free Beta
« Reply #5 on: February 13, 2014, 12:36:58 PM »
You want to try 7... jissie...

I find it quite fascinating. A lot depends on your replay equipment, I believe. You can become quite adept at noticing subtle differences, but then you have to identify the right frequency area... Then listening fatigue sets in....

When I interviewed Sherylle Calder ("the eye doctor") I was taken through some of the vision tests used by top players. These involved watching an ever-increasing number of balls bouncing across a screen and noticing when they changed from rugby to tennis to football, etc. I made it to about level 3 or 4 before I started seeing spots. I was told that top international rugby players operating in the scrum area should be able to pass level 17-18...

So I guess you can be trained to see better. And listen better.

My favourite app of the year. So far, anyway,

Offline kinosfronimos

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Re: Harmon's "How to listen" software available in free Beta
« Reply #6 on: February 14, 2014, 12:39:45 PM »
Anyone else played with it yet?  :baseball:
Monitor Audio Speakers: BR6's, BX-FX's, RX-C; Cambridge Audio: Asure 540R V3 & 540D V2; Samsung LED: 46EH5300; Xonar U3 DAC; Bose SoundTrue Headphones Around-Ear & Beyerdynamic DT770 Cans